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Full text of "Catalogue 1928-1929"

The Curtis Institute 
ofJVlusic 



Philadelphia 



1928 t 1929 




The Curtis Institute 
of Music 

Endowed 
% MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 




CATALOGUE 

1928-1929 



RITTENHOUSE SQUARE 
PHILADELPHIA PENNSYLVANIA 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

WAS CREATED, IN 1924, 
UNDER AN ENDOWMENT 

B M MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 

AND IS OPERATED UNDER A CHARTER OF 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 



PURPOSE 

TO HAND DOWN THROUGH CONTEMPORARY 

MASTERS THE GREAT TRADITIONS 

OF THE PAST. 

TO TEACH STUDENTS TO BUILD 

ON THIS HERITAGE FOR 

THE FUTURE 



Page Five 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Offers to Students 

Instruction by world famous artists who give individual les- 
sons. 

Free tuition. 

Financial aid, if needed. 

Steinway Grands, string and wind instruments rent free, to 
those unable to provide such for themselves. These Stein- 
way pianos will be placed at the disposal of students in their 
respective domiciles. 

Opportunities to attend concerts of the Philadelphia Orchestra 
and of important visiting artists, also performances of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company — as part of their musical 
education. 

Summer sojourns in the United States and Europe, to ad- 
vanced and exceptionally gifted students, under artistic 
supervision of their respective master teachers of the Curtis 
Institute. 

Public appearances during the period of their studies, when 
warranted by their progress, so that they may gain prac- 
tical stage experience. 

In addition to development of the student to full artistic ma- 
turity, financial assistance in setting out upon a public 
career. 



Page Seven 



Director 



Josef Hofmann 



Page Nine 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



OFFICERS 



President 
Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok 

Vice President 
Philip S. Collins 

Secretary and Treasurer 
William Curtis Bok 

Board of Directors 

Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok 
William Curtis Bok 

Philip S. Collins 
Cyrus H. K. Curtis 
Mrs. Samuel S. Fels 



Page Ten 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EXECUTIVE STAFF 

Director 
Josef Hofmann 

Secretary to the Director 
Dorothy Lynch 

Executive Secretary 
David Saperton 

Dean 
Grace H. Spofford 

Assistant to the Dean 
Elizabeth Z. Swenson 

Registrar 
Margaret H. Benkert 

Counselor to the Student Body 
Emily L. McCallip 

Comptroller 
H. W. Eastman 

Librarian 
Marjorie Winn 



Page Eleven 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LOCATION 

The Curtis Institute of Music, facing the green of Ritten- 
house Square, is in the heart of the best residential section of 
Philadelphia. It is within four blocks of the Academy of Music 
where the symphony concerts of the Philadelphia Orchestra, 
the concerts of important visiting artists and the performances 
of the Metropolitan Opera Company of New York are given. 

BUILDINGS 

The buildings comprise three beautiful private residences 
which have been remodeled: yet there has been retained their 
original homelike atmosphere. 

EQUIPMENT 

The equipment and furnishings combine beauty and 

utility. 

LIBRARY 

The library is extensive and of wide scope, embracing 
over 10,000 volumes — books, music and scores. It includes 
many original and unedited editions of music of the great 
masters. 



Page Twelve 




ENTRANCE TO CASIMIR HALL 



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THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CASIMIR HALL 

Architecturally Casimir Hall corresponds to the Main 
Building of the Institute. 

All the resources of modern research have been used to 
make it acoustically perfect, and soundproof against street 
noises. 

The illumination is effected by indirect lighting concealed 
behind the upper moulding all around the hall. The interior 
walls are of white mahogany and paneled up to the ceiling. 

The concert organ is a four-manual Aeolian and is used 
for students' lessons as well as for concerts. 

To facilitate the placing of pianos on the stage, a prosce- 
nium elevator has been devised which allows a section of 
the stage to descend to the basement where the concert grand 
pianos are stored. 

In this hall, the students are given the opportunity of 
acquiring experience in students' concerts under conditions 
equaling those under which they will appear in professional 
life. 



Page Thirteen 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS 

The various Departments of The Curtis Institute of Music 
are under the personal direction and supervision of the follow- 
ing members of its Faculty: 

Marcella Sembrich Voice 

Josef Hofmann Pianoforte 

Lynnwood Farnam Organ 

Leopold Auer Violin 

Louis Bailly Viola and Chamber Music 

Felix Salmond Violoncello 

Carlos Salzedo Harp 

Artur Rodzinski Orchestra 

Rosario Scalero Theory and Composition 

These artists, in each instance, in addition to their duties 
as Heads of Departments, instruct students personally. 



Page Fourteen 




I 



Josef Hofmann 
Director oj the Institute 



_^,-. :T-\.iT»!,Wf.. 




Richard Hageman 



Horatio Connell 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF VOICE 

Marcella Sembrich, Head of Department 

Instructors 

Marcella Sembrich 

Harriet van Emden 

Emilio de Gogorza 

Horatio Connell 

Coaching and Repertoire 

Richard Hageman 

Artur Rodzinski 

Dagmar Rybner Barclay 

Ilsa Reimesch 

Max Pons 

Diction 

Jean B. Beck 

eufemia glannini gregory 
Samuel Arthur King 

Minna Saumelle 
Hermann J. Weigand 

Operatic Acting and Stage Deportment 

WlLHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

Platform Deportment 
Samuel Arthur King 

Page Fifteen 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



MARCELLA SEMBRICH 

Marcella Sembrich Kochanska, who was destined to 
become one of the world's greatest operatic sopranos, was born 
in Lemberg, Poland. She adopted her mother's maiden name 
of Sembrich to serve her professional career. Her first musical 
instruction was received from her father in piano and violin. 
At the age of twelve she appeared in piano and violin recitals, 
and she continued her study of these instruments with Guil- 
laume Stengel in the Lemberg Conservatory. When she was 
sixteen years old, Marcella was sent to Vienna to perfect her 
musical and pianistic training under Julius Epstein, and it 
was here that her great possibilities as a singer were discovered. 
The girl was then sent to study voice with Lamperti in Milan. 

Her debut as singer was made in Athens in 1877, and 
success in opera came swiftly. Engagements in London, 
Paris, Dresden, Berlin, St. Petersburg (Leningrad), Vienna 
and Madrid followed in quick succession, and in 1883 
Madame Sembrich was engaged as leading soprano at the 
Metropolitan Opera, and made her debut as Lucia. Concert 
tours and operatic engagements in Europe alternated with her 
visits to America, and from 1902 to 1909 she was continually 
engaged by the Metropolitan Opera Company. After retiring 
from operatic and concert work, Madame Sembrich devoted 
herself to teaching and has since developed such singers as 
Jeritza, Dusolina Giannini, Hulda Lashanska and Oueena 
Mario. 



Page Sixteen 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EMILIO DE GOGORZA 

Spain, France and England have all shared in the musical 
endowment bestowed upon this artist. He was born of Spanish 
American parentage in Brooklyn, New York, in 1874. In 
England he undertook singing as a serious study and in France 
he made his first appearance on the concert stage. When 
Emilio de Gogorza traveled as a child, it was in London that 
he became a favorite as boy soloist, singing in churches and 
in school choirs. He completed his studies at the Ecole Monge 
and at the Lyc£e Louis-Ie-Grand in Paris, France. 

De Gogorza returned to America for his first serious 
instruction, his teachers being Moderati and Agramonte in 
New York. A visit to Paris resulted in his continuing his 
studies with Emile Bourgeois, singing master of the Op£ra 
Comique. In 1897 de Gogorza was heard in a concert in New 
York with Marcella Sembrich. From that date his appearances 
have been continuous both in recitals and with the leading 
orchestras in the United States and Europe. 

With his unusual gift for languages, Emilio de Gogorza 
has been able to enrich his programs with the rarely heard 
songs and folk music of many races. He has cultivated in his 
audiences a taste and appreciation for the songs of the younger 
French composers, for Russian folk songs, and has revealed a 
new world of Spanish art song in the melodies of Andalusia, 
Catalonia, and the country of the Basques. 



Page Seventeen 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF PIANOFORTE 

Josef Hofmann, Head of Department 

Division of Piano Solo 
Josef Hofmann, Head of Division 

Instructors 

Josef Hofmann 
Alexander Lambert 
isabelle vengerova 

David Saperton 

Division of Accompanying 
Harry Kaufman, Head of Division and Instructor 

Division of Supplementary Piano 
Abram Chasins, Head of Division 

Instructors 

Abram Chasins 

Ethel S. Drummond 

Claire Svecenski 

and others, drawn from the student 

body of the Institute. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORGAN 

Lynnwood Farnam, Head of Department and Instructor 

Page Eighteen 





Josef Hofmann 



Alexander Lambert 





Isabelle Vengerova 



David Saperton 





Harry Kaufman 




Abram Chasins 



Lvnnwood Farnam 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



JOSEF HOFMANN 

A musical lineage that embraced on his father's side a 
piano teacher, pianist-composer and orchestra leader, and on 
his mother's a noted soprano of the Cracow Municipal Opera, 
furnished the background for the youthful genius, Josef 
Hofmann. He was born in 1876 and began to study music 
before the age of four, his first teacher having been his sister. A 
year later Hofmann senior undertook the boy's musical training. 

Josef Hofmann made his first public appearance in a town 
near Warsaw when he was five years old. Other concerts fol- 
lowed in the leading cities of Poland and when he was eight 
he was heard by Anton Rubinstein who predicted a career of 
exceptional brilliance for the youthful prodigy. 

At the age of nine, his first European tour was arranged 
and the boy was heard in Germany, France, England and 
Scandinavia. Soon after, in 1887, he appeared for the first time 
in the United States, giving forty concerts. The remarkable 
playing of the eleven-year-old boy so aroused the enthusiasm 
of Alfred Corning Clark of New York that he generously 
offered to provide his father with the necessary means to fur- 
ther his musical education and artistic growth, whereupon the 
boy returned to Europe to study music in Berlin. Four years 
later he became the only private pupil of Anton Rubinstein. 

In 1894, then eighteen years old, Hofmann returned to 
the concert platform. He toured Germany and England and 
in 1896 made his Russian debut. Two years later he returned 
for a tour of the United States and has since been constantly 
before the public as concert pianist and composer. For the 
last twenty-one years Mr. Hofmann has made his home in the 
United States and has become an American citizen. 

Hofmann's compositions are numerous. His orchestra 
works have been performed in the United States and Europe 
by Nikisch, Schuch, Safonoff, Stokowski, Zach, Gabrilowitsch, 
Damrosch and Stock. 

Page Nineteen 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ALEXANDER LAMBERT 

Born of a musical family in Warsaw, Poland, in 1863, 
Alexander Lambert received his first piano instruction from 
his father, a well-known violinist. 

In 1875, on the advice of Anton Rubinstein who had 
heard the boy play, he was sent to Vienna. There he studied 
at the Conservatory with Julius Epstein, — with Gustave 
Mahler as a co-student. He was graduated with high honors. 

In 1880 he came to America where he remained for three 
years, concertizing and teaching. 

Thereafter he returned to Europe where he was engaged 
by the noted manager, Herman Wolff, to appear in concerts 
and to teach at "Kullaks Akademie der Tonkunst" in Berlin. 
His first concert tours were in conjunction with Joseph 
Joachim and Pablo Sarasate. He also appeared with many 
orchestras and in recitals. 

He then went to Weimar to study with Liszt, his fellow 
students being Moriz Rosenthal, Alexander Siloti, Arthur 
Friedheim and many other well known pianists. 

In 1884 he returned to America to appear as soloist with 
the New York and Boston Symphony Orchestras, and made 
a tour of the leading cities. His love for teaching was always 
uppermost and he established a music school in New York 
City which for eighteen years enjoyed an international repu- 
tation. Today he is acknowledged as one of the leading 
teachers in the United States. 



Page Twenty 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ISABELLE VENGEROVA 

A native of Vilno, Russia, descended from a family that 
was widely known in the field of literature, Isabelle Vengerova, 
at the age of 14, was sent to the Vienna Conservatory, where- 
from she was graduated in 1895. Later, she studied for two 
years with Leschetizky and subsequently with the famous 
pianist, Anette Esipoff. 

Madame Vengerova distinguished herself as a pianist and 
teacher and became assistant to Madame Esipoff at the Im- 
perial Conservatory in St. Petersburg (Leningrad). In 1910 
she was appointed Professor of pianoforte at this famed school 
under the direction of Glazounoff and remained in this posi- 
tion for twelve years. 

Her concert tours of Russia and Western Europe took her 
to the principal centers of music on the continent where she 
was acclaimed as a prominent soloist with orchestra, ensemble 
player and recitalist. With Kochanski and Joseph Press, she 
took part in a Brahms cycle, playing for the first time in 
Russia most of the chamber works of that composer. 

Madame Vengerova left Russia in 1922 and came to the 
United States the following year. She has frequently appeared 
in concerts, and has been a member of the piano faculty of 
the Curtis Institute of Music since its foundation. 



Page Twenty-one 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LYNNWOOD FARNAM 

Born at Sutton in the Province of Quebec in 1885, Lynn- 
wood Farnam, organist, began his musical studies as a pianist 
in Dunham, where, at the age of fifteen, he won the Montreal 
Music Scholarship. This scholarship, contributed by Lord 
Strathcona and Lord Mount Stephen, made possible his four 
years of study at the Royal College of Music in London. His 
teachers were Franklin Taylor and Herbert Sharpe for piano, 
and Dr. James Higgs, F. A. Sewell, and W. S. Hoyte for organ. 

The organ won young Farnam's preference, and to this 
he devoted his chief interest. Returning to Canada in 1904, 
Mr. Farnam received his first appointment as church organist 
in Montreal and soon was appointed organist of Christ Church 
Cathedral. He gave up this post in 1913 to accept a call to 
Emmanuel Church in Boston. The war interrupted his musical 
career, but after his discharge he returned to the United 
States. 

He was engaged as organist by the Fifth Avenue Presby- 
terian Church, New York City, during 1919-20, and since that 
date has been organist of the Church of the Holy Communion 
in New York. Mr. Farnam has had an extensive concert career, 
having appeared as soloist with the Society of the Friends of 
Music, New York, at the Coolidge Foundation Festival of 
Chamber Music in Washington, the Cincinnati Music Festival, 
and on other notable occasions. He has given public perform- 
ances at York Minster, Bath Abbey, the Cathedrals of West- 
minster, Southwark, Exeter, and Christ Church, Oxford, in 
England, and in the American Cathedral in Paris and at the 
Church of St. Ouen in Rouen, France. 



Page Twenty-two 





Leopold Auer 



Efrem Zimbalist 





Lea Luboshutz 



Edwin Bachmann 




Louis Bailly 



Felix Salmond 




Carlos Salzedo 



Albert Meiff 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF VIOLIN 

Leopold Auer, Head of Department 

Instructors 

Leopold Auer 
Efrem Zimbalist 

Lea Luboshutz 
Edwin Bachmann 

Violin Instructor oj Students Majoring in Chamber Music 
and Orchestra Playing 

Albert Meiff 



DEPARTMENTS OF VIOLA AND CHAMBER MUSIC 

Louis Bailly, Head of Departments and Instructor 

DEPARTMENT OF VIOLONCELLO 

Felix Salmond, Head of Department and Instructor 

DEPARTMENT OF HARP 

Carlos Salzedo, Head of Department and Instructor 



Page Twenty-three 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LEOPOLD AUER 

Leopold Auer, dean of violin pedagogues and "maker of 
violinists/' has enjoyed throughout a long life the highest dis- 
tinction in many realms of music. Pre-eminent as a soloist, as 
orchestra conductor and as teacher, he is also widely known 
for his original compositions and transcriptions. During the 
past twenty years, the success of his pupils has brought him 
worldwide fame. 

Born in Hungary, Leopold Auer studied first at the Vienna 
Conservatory and later with Joachim. Before he was twenty he 
was named conductor of the Dusseldorf Orchestra and occu- 
pied a similar post in Hamburg. In 1868 he was appointed court 
violinist at St. Petersburg (Leningrad) and held this post con- 
tinuously until the overthrow of the Imperial regime in Russia. 
He succeeded Wieniawski as Professor of the St. Petersburg 
Conservatory and during this entire period was conductor of 
the Imperial Music Association. He was acclaimed in the prin- 
cipal cities of Europe as the leading violinist of the age. 

Political hazards compelled Professor Auer to leave St. 
Petersburg in 1917, and, after a brief visit to Norway, he came 
to America early in 1918. Here he was engaged for a concert 
tour of the principal cities, after which he devoted himself to 
teaching privately in New York City. Among his pupils are 
numbered Heifetz, Elman, Zimbalist, Kathleen Parlow, 
Poliaken, Cecilia Hansen, Rosen, and Seidel. 



Page Twenty-four 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LEA LUBOSHUTZ 

Lea Luboshutz was born in Odessa and began her concert 
career as a violinist at the age of six. It was upon the advice and 
insistence of Vassily Safonoff, noted Russian conductor, that 
she pursued her studies at the Moscow Conservatory. There she 
received a gold medal for exceptional accomplishment and at 
the age of sixteen was heard in concerts in Poland, Germany 
and France. She appeared with the leading orchestras, includ- 
ing those conducted by Safonoff and Arthur Nikisch. 

Her first appearance in America was as soloist with the 
Russian Symphony Orchestra. This was followed by an ex- 
tensive tour of Russia and other European countries where 
she gave more than one hundred recitals. Mme. Luboshutz 
later studied for three years with Eugene Ysaye and became 
one of his most brilliant pupils. Since then she has appeared 
extensively in concerts in the United States and abroad. 
She has been soloist with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra 
and the Pasdeloup Orchestra in Paris. Madame Luboshutz re- 
turned to America a few years ago as soloist with the State 
Symphony of New York. She has since been heard as soloist 
with the leading symphony orchestras in this country. 



Page Tweniy-five 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EFREM ZIMBALIST 

Known throughout the musical world as one of the most 
brilliant concert violinists, Efrem Zimbalist displayed as a 
child the genius that was to bring him future renown. At the 
age of nine he was appointed first violin in the orchestra of the 
Rostov Opera, in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, where he was born. 
Soon after he was sent to study with Professor Leopold Auer at 
the Imperial Conservatory of Music in Petrograd. 

The principal cities of Europe had already acclaimed him 
as one of the world's greatest violinists when he made his 
American debut in 1911. Since then Mr. Zimbalist has been 
heard in the principal cities of the civilized world, has appeared 
as soloist with the leading orchestras and has made several 
tours around the world. He has contributed original compo- 
sitions for the violin, piano and voice, and has composed 
successful light operas. 



Page Twenty-six 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LOUIS BAILLY 

A native of Valenciennes, France, Louis Bailly, at the 
age of seventeen, won a first prize for viola playing at the 
Paris Conservatoire. He soon gained a reputation as soloist, 
playing with the Concerts Colonne, the Societe des Concerts 
du Conservatoire and other larger orchestras. 

Having decided upon a career as a specialist in Chamber 
Music, he became a founder-member of the famous Capet 
Quartet, whose annual performances of all the Quartets of 
Beethoven are still events in the musical life of the continent. 
From this organization he passed to the Geloso Quartet with 
whom, until the outbreak of the Great War, he toured Europe, 
playing before notable audiences . By special permission of the 
French Government, Mr. Bailly came to New York as a 
member of the Flonzaley Quartet. He rapidly became as well 
known in the United States and Canada as he had been in 
Europe, both as a virtuoso viola player and as a member of 
such organizations as the Flonzaley and Elman Quartets. 
With Harold Bauer at the piano, he gave the first performance 
of Ernest Bloch's "Suite for Viola and Piano" at the Pittsfield 
Festival in 1919. Mr. Bailly has appeared as soloist with the 
Philadelphia Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the National 
Symphony under Bodanzky and with the Friends of Music, 
New York City. For nine years he has been a member of the 
Jury of the Paris Conservatoire. 



Page Twenly-sevcn 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



FELIX SALMOND 

A musical endowment was the birthright of this violon- 
cellist; his father was Norman Salmond, the celebrated English 
bass-baritone; his mother was a professional pianist. Felix Sal- 
mond was born in London in 1888. His early gifts matured un- 
der the tutelage of Professor W. E. Whitehouse of the Royal 
College of Music in London, where at the end of three years 
young Salmond won a scholarship which he retained for a 
period of four years. He then continued his studies in Brussels 
with Edouard Jacobs. 

Mr. Salmond made his debut in London in 1909, and 
thereafter appeared in concerts throughout Great Britain. He 
was invited by Sir Edward Elgar to appear as soloist in the 
premiere of that composer's Concerto for Violoncello and 
Orchestra, played by the London Symphony. In 1921 he made 
his debut on the Continent in a recital in Amsterdam after 
having devoted two seasons to ensemble playing with the 
Chamber Music Players. 

Mr. Salmond has appeared in concerts with the most cele- 
brated pianists of the day, and as soloist with the leading or- 
chestras. He made his first concert appearance in the United 
States in 1922, and has alternated his visits here with concert 
tours of Europe. While Mr. Salmond is recognized as one of 
the leading exponents of the classical repertoire for the 'cello, 
he has done much to introduce the works of modern composers. 



Page Twenty-eight 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CARLOS SALZEDO 

Destined to become the leading single factor in elevating 
the harp to a position of undisputed authority and popularity, 
Carlos Salzedo, the creator of "contemporary harpism," won 
his earliest laurels in piano and solfege. He was born in 1885 in 
the province of Gironde, France, and entered the Bordeaux 
Conservatory at the age of seven. In two years he had won first 
prizes in the piano and solfege departments. Thence he went to 
the Paris Conservatory, and at the age of twelve began the 
study of the harp. Four years later he won in one day the First 
Prizes for both piano and harp at the Paris Conservatory. 

Until he was twenty, Salzedo toured Europe both as 
pianist and harpist. Not until 1909, when Gatti-Casazza en- 
gaged him as solo harpist with the Metropolitan Opera, did the 
young musician finally determine which instrument would be 
the one to fashion his career. But once having adopted the 
harp, Salzedo set about to elevate it to its proper place of im- 
portance. He founded organizations and movements to attract 
public interest, and alternated his tours of America with visits 
to Europe. The outbreak of the war found him in Europe with 
the Trio de Lutece, and after his discharge from the army, 
Salzedo returned to the United States. 

He organized the Salzedo Harp Ensemble, and was elected 
president of the National Association of Harpists, which office 
he still holds. With Edgar Varese, he formed the International 
Composers' Guild, and issued a magazine, Eolus, devoted to 
contemporary music. As a teacher he revitalized harp tech- 
nique and created the system of symbols now universally used 
to designate the means of producing desired effects. His 
"Modern Study of the Harp" is the recognized textbook in this 
branch of music. Salzedo's compositions and transcriptions are 
numerous. His symphonic poem, "The Enchanted Isle," has 
been played by the Symphony Orchestras of Chicago, Detroit, 
Philadelphia and Boston. 

Page Twenty-nine 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF ORCHESTRA 

Artur Rodzinski, Head of Department 

Conductor of the Students' Orchestra 

Instructor of Conducting 

and Orchestra Classes 



Instructors 

Double Bass, Anton Torello 

Flute, William M. Kincaid 

Clarinet, Lucien Cailliet 

Oboe, Marcel Tabuteau 

Bassoon, Walter Guetter 

Contrabassoon, Ferdinand Del Negro 

Horn, Anton Horner 

Trumpet, Sol Cohen 

Trombone, Gardell Simons 

Tuba, Philip A. Donatelli 

Percussion, Oscar Schwar 

(All the above are members of the Philadelphia Orchestra.) 



Page Thirty 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



COURSES IN ORCHESTRA INSTRUMENTS 

There is in the United States a serious lack of players of 
woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments, qualified to hold 
posts in the many symphony orchestras scattered throughout 
the country. There are today more excellent positions, wait- 
ing to be worthily filled, than there are players ready to fill 
them. 

The instructors of the orchestra instruments are artists 
who hold the posts of solo players of these various instruments 
in the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

The Orchestra 

All students of string instruments and those specializing 
in woodwind, brass and percussion, are required to take part 
regularly in the rehearsals and concerts of the student orches- 
tra. This training is intensified by participation in the orches- 
tra of various solo players of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

Orchestra Classes 

These classes will give students preliminary training in 
orchestra technique, routine, and sight-reading. 



Page Thirty-one 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ARTUR RODZINSKI 

An innate love for music persisted during the early forma- 
tive years of Artur Rodzinski, despite the fact that his father, 
who was an army surgeon stationed at Lemberg, Poland, chose 
the profession of law for his son. Born in 1893, young Rodzinski 
attended the Vienna University where he received the degree 
of Doctor of Laws. Having obeyed the parental dictum, he 
then turned to music, his real love. At the Vienna Aca- 
demy he studied piano with Sauer and Lalewicz, theory and 
composition with Marx and Schreker. His teacher in conduct- 
ing was Schalk, and soon young Rodzinski was conducting 
with Schreker the chorus of the Vienna Philharmonic Society, 
and produced the "Totenmesse" of Berlioz. 

The war interrupted Rodzinski's musical activities; but 
having been wounded in action, he received his discharge and 
became conductor of the Lemberg Opera. Later he was ap- 
pointed first conductor of the Warsaw Opera, and here he was 
enabled to display his initiative in the presentation of new 
works. Ravel's "L'Heure Espagnole," Strauss' "Rosenkava- 
lier," D' Albert's "Tote Augen" and Ferrari's "Jewels of the 
Madonna" were all heard under the leadership of Rodzinski 
before their presentation in the larger cities of Europe. During 
this period he was also conductor of the Philharmonic Orches- 
tra in Warsaw. In 1925 he was engaged by Leopold Stokowski 
as assistant conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 



Page Thirty-two 






Gardell Simons 



William M. Kincaid 



Lucien Cailhet 




Artur Rodzinski 



Marcel Tabuteau 




Sol Cohen 



Walter Guetter 




Philip A. Donatelli Anton Torello Ferdinand Del Negro Oscar Schwar 




Anne-Marie 
Soffray 



Renee 
Longy-Miquelle 



Ernest Zechiel 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF THEORY AND COMPOSITION 

ROSARIO SCALERO 

Head of Department 

and Instructor in Composition, 

Instrumentation and Orchestration 

Instructor in Elementary Counterpoint 
and Elementary Harmony 

Ernest Zechiel 

Instructors in Soljege 

Renee Longy Miquelle 

Anne-Marie Soffray 

ACCOMPANISTS 

Harry Kaufman 
Official Accompanist of the Institute 

Other Accompanists: 

Dagmar Rybner Barclay 

Ilsa Reimesch 

and others, drawn from the student 

body of the Institute 



Page Thirty-three 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ROSARIO SCALERO 

In his art Johannes Brahms represents the last of the Ger- 
man masters in whom was blended the tradition of Italian and 
German art, this tradition having come to him from Palestrina 
through an unbroken line of teachers including Albrici (Pales- 
trina's pupil and first cantor of the St. Thomas Church in Leip- 
zig), Fasch, Zelter, Mendelssohn, Joachim, Nottebohm and 
Mandyczewski. Before he reached the end of his glorious ca- 
reer, Brahms had gathered about him in Vienna a circle of art- 
ists who still lived in that marvelous atmosphere where Beetho- 
ven and Schubert had not yet become legendary figures. It was 
into this environment that Scalero came to live as a young man 
and remained for seven years studying composition with Man- 
dyczewski, one of the most intimate friends of Brahms and the 
editor of Schubert's and Haydn's complete works. 

Scalero, born in 1873, began his musical career as a violinist 
at the Liceo Musicale in Turin. Later his studies proceeded 
with Camillo Sivori in Genoa and then with August Wilhelmj 
in London. At the age of twenty, Scalero won the title of Dis- 
tinguished Academician of the Royal Academy of St. Cecilia in 
Rome and after his studies with Mandyczewski he was ap- 
pointed Docent of Musical Form at the same Academy. 

After a series of concerts in the principal cities of Europe, 
Scalero settled in Rome, where he founded the Societa del 
Ouartetto for the performance of ensemble and choral works. 
He has also acted as High Commissioner for Examinations for 
the Conservatories of Naples, Rome and Parma. His works 
are numerous and include compositions for violin, piano and 
orchestra. 



Page Thirty-jour 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LECTURES ON ART 

A series of eight lectures on Fundamental Principles of 
Expression in Art will be given by Leo Katz, painter and art 
critic of New York . 

1 . A Modern Vision of the Development 

of Art October 8 

2. Impersonal Elements: Symbolic and 

Magic Art (with experiments) .... October 15 

3. Rhythm, Personal Expression 

(with experiments) October 22 

4. Color and Light October 29 

5. The Phenomenon of Vision November 5 

6. Intuition, Religion and Art . . . November 12 

7. The Form of Speed November 19 

8. The Latest Phases in Art .... November 26 



Page Thirty-fi\>t 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 

Believing that a broad cultural background is an essential 
factor in the making of an artist, the Institute, in its Academic 
Department, offers numerous courses of studies supplementary 
to the major work in music, whereby the students may secure 
a foundation on which to build in the future. 

The Faculty 

French, and History of Music 

Jean B. Beck, Ph.D. 

Professor of Romance Languages and Literature 

Lecturer on the History of Music 

University of Pennsylvania 

World History 

Roy F. Nichols, A.M.. Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

University of Pennsylvania 

English Composition and English Literature 

William Page Harbeson, LL.B., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English Literature 

University of Pennsylvania 

Elbert Lenrow, A.M. 

Instructor in English 
University of Pennsylvania 

English Diction and Platform Deportment 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A. (London) 

Lecturer in English Diction 

Bryn Mawr College 



Page thirty-six 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Italian 

EUFEMIA GlANNINI GREGORY 

German 

Hermann J. Weigand, Ph.D. 

Professor of German Literature 

University of Pennsylvania 

Psychology 

Samuel W. Fernberger, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

University of Pennsylvania 

Academic Tutor 
Mary B. Wesner, A.B. 

Students, unless excused for some valid reason, are required to study 
at least one academic subject each year and to attend certain lectures. 



Page Thirty-seven 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



STUDIES 



Voice 

Pianoforte: 
Solo 

Accompanying 
Supplementary 

Organ 

Violin 

Viola 

Violoncello 

Harp 

Chamber Music 

and Ensemble Playing 

Operatic Coaching 
and Repertoire 

Operatic Acting and 
Stage Deportment 

Platform Deportment 

Theory: 

Harmony 

Counterpoint 

Solfege 

Dictation 

Chamber Music Score 

Reading 
Elements of Music 
Instrumentation 
Orchestra Score Reading 



Composition 

Orchestration 

Conducting 

Orchestra Playing 

Orchestra Instruments: 
Double Bass 
Flute 
Clarinet 
Oboe 
Bassoon 
Horn 
Trumpet 
Trombone 
Tuba 
Percussion 

History of Music 

World History 

Psychology 

Languages, Literature 
and Diction: 
English 
French 
Italian 
German 



Page Thirty-tight 





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Page Forty-one 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRANCE 
EXAMINATIONS 

The entrance requirements are presented here in a general 
form, allowing the applicant latitude in the selection of works 
to be presented for examination. While the choice of composi- 
tions is important, the manner of performance carries far 
greater weight. The final decision as to the suitability of an 
applicant for acceptance rests upon the evidence of talent 
shown, in the examination, rather than upon the degree of 
advancement already attained. Admission is limited to such 
applicants as possess unusual talent for the major subject 
selected and who give promise of developing professional 
excellence. Selection from among the applicants is made by 
competitive elimination. The examiners do not assume the 
obligation of hearing all that an applicant is required to have 
in readiness for examination. 

Voice 

The applicant must possess an exceptionally good voice, 
health, vitality, musical talent and personality. In addition, 
the applicant should have at least an elementary knowledge of 
music and of pianoforte, while some knowledge of languages 
is very desirable. 

Four selections from operatic arias, oratorios or songs, 
showing the range and power of the voice, should be submitted 
from memory. The selections should be chosen from the works 
of the following composers: Parisotti, Handel, Schubert, 
Schumann, Franz, Brahms, Strauss, Tschaikowsky, Rach- 
maninoff, Faure, Debussy, Duparc, Mozart, Bizet, Saint- 
Saens, Puccini, or Wagner. 

Applicants should not be over twenty- three years of age. 

Page Forty-two 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Pianoforte 

Applicants must play from memory a Three-part Inven- 
tion or a Prelude and Fugue from The Well-Tempered Clavi- 
chord of Bach; a Beethoven sonata, complete; two selections — 
one slow and one brilliant — from the works of Chopin or Schu- 
mann (preferably Chopin). 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

Accompanying 
Applicants shall demonstrate sufficient pianistic ability 
to play satisfactorily some of the more difficult studies of 
Cramer-Biilow, Clementi-Tausig, or Czerny, Opus 740. In 
addition, special stress shall be laid upon the candidate's sight- 
reading powers and sense of musical values as shown by his 
ability to play with reasonable fluency either primo or secondo 
parts of such orchestral and chamber works arranged for four 
h ands, as the examiner may choose and upon his ability to read 
at sight accompaniments for the violinist or singer. The appli- 
cant shall moreover have a fair acquaintance either with some 
of the standard violin and 'cello works, or, if his preference lie 
in the direction of vocal accompaniment, some knowledge of 
song literature. 

Organ 

The following should be submitted from memory: (a) 
Fugue or principal movement from a sonata or symphony, 
(b) a trio and (c) a slow movement. 

Applicants must also play the following on the pianoforte: 
(a) a study, (b) a nocturne or other slow movement. 

Applicants should not be over twenty-three years of age. 

Violin 
Applicants should have a precise knowledge of the positions 
and the change of positions, double notes, and a complete com- 
mand of scales and the usual ways of bowing. They should be 

Page Forty-three 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



able to play selected studies from Kreutzer, Rode and Fiorillo, 
and one or more concertos from the works of the following com- 
posers: de Beriot, Viotti, Spohr, or Vieuxtemps. Selections 
should be submitted from memory. 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

Viola 

Applicants must have some knowledge of the clefs, the 
positions, scales and arpeggios; and be familiar with some of 
the standard violin studies such as those of Kreutzer, Rode, 
and also Campagnoli's 41 Caprices, Op. 22, which are especi- 
ally written for the viola. They should also be able to play one 
movement of Firket's or Hans Sitt's Concertos. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

Violoncello 

Applicants must be able to play satisfactorily all major 
and minor scales and arpeggios; also, a fast and a slow move- 
ment from a Bach Suite. They may choose for a second com- 
position one movement of a concerto from the standard reper- 
toire or one movement from a sonata for piano and violoncello, 
classical or modern. It is desirable, but not obligatory, that 
selections be submitted from memory. 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

Harp 

Applicants should possess a knowledge of the principles 
of modern harp playing and be familiar with the "fundamental 
position." Knowledge of piano playing is desirable. Applicants 
should submit from memory two works of contemporary com- 
posers and two transcriptions from the classics. 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

Page Forty-jour 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Orchestra Instruments 

The applicant must possess at least an elementary knowl- 
edge of music, a good ear, a good sense of rhythm, be able to 
read from sight, and show talent and aptitude for the instru- 
ment of his selection. 

Composition 

Applicants must submit examples of original work, indicat- 
ing the possession of genuine creative ability. 

Conducting 

Applicants must possess a working knowledge of clefs and 
transpositions, a good ear, a fair knowledge of piano or of some 
orchestra instrument, and adequate theoretic preparation. 

Orchestra Playing — Chamber Music Playing 

These departments have been created to provide Orches- 
tra and Chamber Music experience to advanced players and 
to enable them to gain a comprehensive and practical knowl- 
edge of the Orchestra and Chamber Music repertories. 

Individual instruction to applicants under these headings 
will be given only to Violin students who require it. 

Applicants under these headings who need individual 
instruction in other string instruments, woodwind, brass or 
percussion should apply for instruction in their respective in- 
struments under the headings provided therefor on the appli- 
cation blank. 

All of the above mentioned applicants, if accepted, will 
be entitled to participate in Chamber and Orchestra Playing 
respectively. 

All branches of supplementary study are open to appli- 
cants for these departments. 

Applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

Page Forty-five 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ASSIGNMENT TO INSTRUCTORS 

Students are assigned to instructors in accordance with 
the recommendation of the examiners. While requests for in- 
struction with particular instructors will be given careful con- 
sideration, the right is reserved to make such assignments as 
seem to be for the best interests of the students. Instructors 
reserve the right of final acceptance or rejection. 

ENROLLMENT REQUIREMENTS 

Upon request, forms of Application for Admission will be 
sent to prospective students. 

The acceptance of an applicant is conditioned upon the 
passing of the entrance examination in the major subject. 

Commencing October, 1928, all tuition at The Curtis 
Institute of Music will be free; however, a registration fee of 
$20 must accompany the Application for Admission. This will 
entitle the applicant to take the entrance examination at the 
time set by The Curtis Institute of Music. 

Whether or not the applicant is accepted, the registration 
fee will be allotted to the Students' Assistance Fund. 

An application already on file may be cancelled, if written 
request is made, not less than ten days in advance of examina- 
tion date, in which case the registration fee will be returned. 



Pain Forty -six 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Living Accommodations 

Upon request, rooming accommodations selected by the 
Counselor to the Student Body will be recommended to stu- 
dents, according to individual needs and means. Scale of rentals 
and any further details desired may be obtained from the 
Student Counselor. 

Practice Facilities 

For this purpose, the Institute has studios equipped with 
Stein way pianos which may be used by students. One of these 
practice studios is equipped with a three-manual Aeolian prac- 
tice pipe organ. 

Health Measures 

A physician has been appointed by the Institute to give 
immediate attention to students, in case of illness. 

Dining Room 

Home-cooked luncheons and dinners (served at cost) form 
a pleasant break in the study day. The students and the 
members of the faculty eating at the same tables, incidentally 
become better acquainted and in this manner bridge the 
distance which so often exists between student and instructor. 



Page Forly-seven 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CALENDAR 

For the School Year 1928-29 

First Term Begins Monday, October 1, 1928 

First Term Ends .... Thursday, January 31, 1929 
Second Term Begins .... Friday, February 1, 1929 
Second Term Ends Friday, May 31, 1929 



Thanksgiving 
Christmas Vacation 

Washington's Birthday 



Holidays 

Thursday, November 29, 1928 

. . . December 23, 1928 to 
January 2, 1929 (both inclusive) 

. Friday, February 22, 1929 



Easter Vacation March 29 to April 3, 1929 

(both inclusive) 

Memorial Day Thursday, May 30, 1929 

Entrance Examinations 

Entrance examinations are held at The Curtis Institute of 
Music in Philadelphia in April and May of each year. 

The entrance examination dates for each department may 
be had upon request. 



Page Forty-eight 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



THE CURTIS QUARTET 

The Curtis Quartet has been organized as an integral 
part of The Curtis Institute of Music. It consists of the follow- 
ing members of the Faculty: Lea Luboshutz, first violin, Ed- 
win Bachmann, second violin, Louis Bailly, viola, and Felix 
Salmond, violoncello. 

In 1927-28, aside from its concerts for the students, the 
Curtis Quartet appeared in Philadelphia, New York, and 
Washington. 



Page Forty-nine 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



FACULTY RECITALS 

During the School Year, 1927-28, the following recitals 
were given by members of the Faculty; 



November 9 
December 3 
December 14 
January 4. . 

January 11.. 

January 25 . . 
February 8 . 
February 15. 
February 29. 



. Felix Salmond Violoncellist 

. Josef Hofmann Pianist 

. Curtis Quartet 

Lucile Lawrence Harpist 

(Lea Luboshutz Violinist 

" \ Josef Hofmann Pianist 

Emanuel Zetlin Violinist 

Moriz Rosenthal Pianist 

.Carl Flesch Violinist 

. Emilio de Gogorza Baritone 

March 7. . . . Lea Luboshutz Violinist 

March 21 Horatio Connell Baritone 

April 12 Carlos Salzedo Harpist 

April 18 Louis Bailly Viola 

April 23 Harriet van Emden Soprano 

May 16 Abram Chasins Pianist-Composer 

May 24 Josef Hofmann Pianist 

Three lecture-recitals on Music of the Past were given by 
Wanda Landowska: 

November 13. Descriptive Music of the Sixteenth, Seven- 
teenth and Eighteenth Centuries. 

November 20 . . Johann Sebastian Bach and His Relation to 
His Predecessors and His Contemporaries. 

December 4. . Old Dances — How They Were Danced and 
Played. 



April 25 The Henri Casadesus Ensemble of Ancient 

Instruments. 

(This concert was tendered by "The Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge 
Foundation," The Library of Congress.) 



Page Fijfy 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



STUDENTS' CONCERTS 

Thirty- three Students' Concerts were given during the 
School Year, 1927-28, with programs presented by students 
in Pianoforte, Organ, Voice, Violin, Viola, Violoncello, Harp, 
Chamber Music and Orchestra. 

In the seven Students' Concerts devoted to Chamber 
Music, the following works were played: 

Antheil Second String Quartet (1927) 

Brahms Horn Trio in E flat major, Op. 40 

Pianoforte Quintet in F minor, Op. 54 

Pianoforte Trio in C minor, Op. 101 

Sonata in G major for Violin and Piano, Op. 78 

Chausson Concert in D major for Pianoforte, Violin, and 

String Quartet 

Franck Pianoforte Quintet in F minor 

Haydn String Quartet in D major, Op. 20, No. 4 

String Quartet in D major, Op. 64, No. 5 

d'Indy String Quartet, Op. 35 

Malipiero Rispetti e Strambotti; String Quartet 

Mozart Pianoforte Trio in G major (Kochel 496) 

String Quartet in B flat major (Kochel 458) 
Symphonie Concertante in E flat major, for 
Violin and Viola 

Saint-Saens . . Pianoforte Trio in F major, Op. 18 

Pianoforte Quartet in B flat major, Op. 41 

Schubert Octet for Clarinet, Horn, Bassoon and String 

Quintet, Op. 166 
String Quartet in D minor, Op. Posthumous 
String Quintet in C major, Op. 163 

Page Fijty-one 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



STUDENT ORCHESTRA CONCERTS 

Several student orchestra concerts are given each year. 
The last of such concerts was given Wednesday evening, 
February 22, 1928, for the Philadelphia Forum, in the Acad- 
emy of Music, Artur Rodzinski conducting. The following 
was the program; 

Carl Maria von Weber Overture from "Oberon" 

Antonin Dvorak "From the New World" — 

Symphony No. 5, in E minor 

Adagio — Allegro molto 

Largo 

Scherzo — Molto vivace 

Allegro con fuoco 



Richard Wagner "Was duftet doch der Flieder" 

from "Die Meistersinger" 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart . . "Qui sdegno non s'accende" 

from "The Magic Flute" 

Wilbur Evans, Basso 



Franz Liszt "Les Preludes" — Symphonic 

Poem No. 3 



Page Fifly-lwo 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LIST OF STUDENTS 
1927-1928 

Abram, Jack G Houston, Texas 

Adohmyan, Lahn* Philadelphia 

Airoff, Helene* Los Angeles, California 

Alexander, Norma P.* . . Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Amansky, Selma C Baltimore, Maryland 

Anderson, M. Elizabeth . . . Barnesville, Georgia 

Anderson, Margaret E Magnolia, Arkansas 

Aronoff, Max Philadelphia 

Balkin, Matilda* Chicago, Illinois 

Bampton, Rose E Buffalo, New York 

Barabini, Olga* New York City 

Barber, Samuel West Chester, Pennsylvania 

Barozzi, Adine A Paris, France 

Behrend, Jeanne Philadelphia 

Berkowitz, Rosela S.* . . . . Philadelphia 

Berman, Grace Detroit, Michigan 

Binz, Ralph E Philadelphia 

Bitter, John F New York City 

Blankenship, Marion G. ... Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Bloom, Irving R.* Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Bloom, James S Philadelphia 

Bodanskaya, Natalie .... New York City 

Bolet, Jorge L Havana, Cuba 

Boswell, Guy McC Cleveland, Ohio 

Boyington, Alfred M Kansas City, Missouri 

Braun, Edith E Merion, Pennsylvania 

Braverman, Bella Philadelphia 

Briselli, Iso Odessa, Russia 

Brock, Anne B.* Philadelphia 

Cameron, Richard J.* . . . . Philadelphia 

Cameron, William T Providence, Rhode Island 

Carettnay, Illa Philadelphia 

Carroll, William B.* . . . . Chicago, Illinois 

Page Fijly-lhree 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Cassini, Leonard London, England 

Cato, Robert H Detroit, Michigan 

Chalifoux, Alice E Birmingham, Alabama 

Challenger, Edward P., II* New Castle, Delaware 

Chasins, Abram W New York City 

Chasins, Ethel New York City 

CHERKASSKY, Shura Odessa, Russia 

Coffey, John W New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Colley, Christine Dayton, Ohio 

Cole, Orlando T Philadelphia 

Collis, James A Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 

Compton, Frederick L Philadelphia 

Conant, Katherine L Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

Connor, Edith S Philadelphia 

Coryell, Marian A Grand Ledge, Michigan 

Coye, John S Wilmington, Delaware 

Cray, Robert E Houston, Texas 

Davis, Agnes Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Davis, Edwin G., Jr Washington, D. C. 

Davis, Verlye A.* Chicago, Illinois 

Deak, Stephen Philadelphia 

Demarest, Charles N.* . . . . Madison, Wisconsin 

Diamond, Paceli Philadelphia 

Eberhard, Ernestine H. ... Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Edwards, Christine Glendale, California 

Epstein, Max Brooklyn, New York 

Evans, Wilbur Philadelphia 

Ferguson, Paull F Robinson, Illinois 

Fields, Eleanor L Norristown, Pennsylvania 

Fink, Mary M Baltimore, Maryland 

FiNKELSTEiN, Sidney E Miami, Florida 

Fischoff, Joseph South Bend, Indiana 

Fox, Earl E Scranton, Pennsylvania 

Frantz, Florence Philadelphia 

Freed, David San Diego, California 

Frengut, Leon Baltimore, Maryland 

Page Fifty-Jour 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Fulda, Boris Moscow, Russia 

Fulton, Marjorie McA Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

Garratt, Harold V Philadelphia 

Gatter, Herman L Wyncote, Pennsylvania 

Gershman, Paul Vineland, New Jersey 

Geschichter, Cecille .... Los Angeles, California 

Gesensway, Louis Toronto, Canada 

Gilbert, Gama Philadelphia 

Gomberg, Celia Philadelphia 

Gomberg, Robert Philadelphia 

Gough, Frank, Jr Lumberton, North Carolina 

Gray, Alexander* Providence, Rhode Island 

Gray, John Providence, Rhode Island 

Greenwood, Flora B Wichita Falls, Texas 

Groban, Benjamin Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Gumpert, Winifred E.* . . . . Monocacy, Pennsylvania 

Halbwachs, Martha L New York City 

Hall, Helen Dallas, Texas 

Haltenorth, Bernhard W. . Atlantic City, New Jersey 

Hardsteen, Helene P Santa Monica, California 

Hare, Esther B Caldwell, Idaho 

Harmaala, John H Gloucester, Massachusetts 

Harms, William H Ottawa, Kansas 

Headman, Frank M Roxborough, Pennsylvania 

Healy, Daniel L Framingham, Massachusetts 

Helman, Sascha J New York City 

Hepler, Emily S Ventnor, New Jersey 

Hering, Sigmund* New York City 

Hice, Arthur E Philadelphia 

Hirsh, Harry S Baltimore, Maryland 

Hochstetter, Edna B Philadelphia 

Hodge, Dorothy F Radnor, Pennsylvania 

Hodge, Muriel B Radnor, Pennsylvania 

Hodge, Sonia Kansas City, Missouri 

Hooper, Carl V Mapleton Depot, Pennsylvania 

Horle, Henriette Philadelphia 

Irons, Florence E Burlington, New Jersey 

Page Fijty-five 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Jepson, Helen E Akron, Ohio 

Jirak, Josephine A Kansas City, Kansas 

Johnson, I. Kenneth Olean, New York 

Johnson, W. Russell* .... Philadelphia 

Jones, Francis E Schenectady, New York 

Jusko, Ralph V Worcester, Massachusetts 

Kahn, Gordon G New York City 

Kaplan, Vilma Baltimore, Maryland 

Kojev, Nickolas N.* Yaroslav, Russia 

Kopelman, Samuel A.* . Philadelphia 

Kowalska, Sabina W Wilmington, Delaware 

Krainis, Abraham Philadelphia 

Kramer, Erma K.* Reading, Pennsylvania 

Krechmer, William F.* . . . . Philadelphia 

Krinsky, Yvonne Newark, New Jersey 

Krupnick, Abraham E Philadelphia 

Lamas, Eugene Los Angeles, California 

Lazzaro, Alfio Philadelphia 

Lee, Warren L.* Philadelphia 

Lehnhoff, Sheppard I Chicago, Illinois 

Lenrow, Elbert Binghamton, New York 

Levin, Sylvan Baltimore, Maryland 

Levine, Joseph S Philadelphia 

Levine, Robert S Dormont, Pennsylvania 

Levitt, Anna New York City 

Lewis, Eleanor J St. Albans, Vermont 

LoCKWOOD, Ross S Duquesne, Pennsylvania 

Luchs, Selma B Philadelphia 

McAlister, Saidee G Tupelo, Mississippi 

McCurdy, Alexander, Jr. . . Eureka, California 

McGinnis, Robert E Wyncote, Pennsylvania 

DE MACHULA, TiBOR J Budapest, Hungary 

Mapes, Gordon M.* Binghamton, New York 

Marks, Maxwell Philadelphia 

Marzyck, Mary A Denver, Colorado 

Matison, Lily Santa Monica, California 

Mayers, Bernard L.* .... Lakewood, New Jersey 

Page Fijty-six 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Mehus, Alma K Brinsmade, North Dakota 

Meiskey, Elsa E Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Menotti, Gian-Carlo .... Milan, Italy 

Meredith, Eleanor F Coatesville, Pennsylvania 

Meyer, Felix Jacksonville, Florida 

Miller, Eugenie Philadelphia 

Mitchell, Ercelle Baltimore, Maryland 

Molind, Aaron Philadelphia 

Montgomery, Mary B Villa Nova, Pennsylvania 

Morales, Angelica M.* . . Mexico City, Mexico 

Morseman, Florence J Sedalia, Missouri 

Murdock, Victoria M Wichita, Kansas 

Nazarevitch, Xenia New York City 

Neufeld, Ernst N Kosice, Czecho-Slovakia 

Nicoletta, Eleanor J Philadelphia 

Noyes, B. Frank Groton, Connecticut 

O'Hara, James J.* Rockland, Maine 

Paget, Ethel M Philadelphia 

Peckham, Irene . ■ Little Rock, Arkansas 

Pepper, George Los Angeles, California 

Perssion, Ruth* Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Petraites, Peter V Homestead, Pennsylvania 

Pfohl, Ruth W Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Phillips, Edna M Reading, Pennsylvania 

Pickens, Jane Atlanta, Georgia 

Polisi, William Philadelphia 

Pons, Max Amsterdam, Holland 

Poska, Judith Seattle, Washington 

Prydatkevych, Roman .... New York City 

zu Putlitz, Lois Los Angeles, California 

Pyle, Ella W Wilmington, Delaware 

Ralston, Howard L New Concord, Ohio 

Raphael, Bernard Philadelphia 

Reatha, Reva Detroit, Michigan 

Regina Dolores, Sister .... Philadelphia 

Reinert, Clarence W Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Reinhardt, Donald S Llanerch Manor, Pennsylvania 



Page Fijly-seven 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Reinhardt, Louise 
Resnikoff, Vera 
Richardson, John B. . 
Robinson, Carl R. 
Robofsky, Abraham H. 
Roubleff, Inna 
Ruggieri, Frank 



Wilmington, Delaware 
Odessa, Russia 
Philadelphia 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Baltimore, Maryland 
St. Petersburg, Russia 
Philadelphia 



Saidenberg, Theodore .... Philadelphia 

Savitt, Jay Philadelphia 

Scanlon, Ella H Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Schwartz, Frank J Philadelphia 

Schwartz, Isadore Philadelphia 

Sharlip, Benjamin Philadelphia 

Sharp, Marion Salt Lake City, Utah 

Sharp, Maurice O Sheridan, Wyoming 

Shelton, Frances E Dania, Florida 

Sheridan, Frances E New Castle, Delaware 

Sherman, Charles Philadelphia 

Shopmaker, Leopold Kansas City, Kansas 

Siegl, Henry W Detroit, Michigan 

Simons, Charlotte Chicago, Illinois 

Sivel, Margaret E Philadelphia 

Smith, Norman P.* Philadelphia 

Stark, Ethel Montreal, Canada 

Stern, Lucie Riga, Latvia 

Stetler, Floraine A Detroit, Michigan 

Stevens, Margaret Collingswood, New Jersey 

Swenson, Ervin I Murdock, Minnesota 

Tasso, Fiorenzo Lamparo, Italy 

Temianka, Henri Antwerp, Belgium 

Terranova, Maria* Highland Park, Pennsylvania 

Thibault, Conrad W Northampton, Massachusetts 

Thurmond, James M Dallas, Texas 

TOLCES, ToSKA New York City 

Townsend, Richard E Philadelphia 

Townsend, Winifred Philadelphia 

Trafficante, Elisabeth .... Philadelphia 



Page Fijly-eighl 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Ullberg, Lloyd E Turlock, California 

Van Laningham, Marion M. Des Moines, Iowa 

Walker, Louise P Ottawa, Kansas 

Walstrum, Theodore P Ridgewood, New Jersey 

Weinrich, Carl Paterson, New Jersey 

Westmoreland, Elizabeth B. . Antlers, Oklahoma 

Whitehead, Henry C Norfolk, Virginia 

Williams, Florence Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Wilson, Frank M Meridian, Mississippi 

Woempner, Carl Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Wyner, Louis Atlantic City, New Jersey 

Yaeckel, Louis W Hollywood, California 

Zimmerman, Oscar G Philadelphia 

* Withdrawing before the close of the year. 



Page Fifty -nine 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Accompanists 33 

Assignment to Instructors 45 

Biographical Notes — Auer, Leopold 24 

Bailly, Louis 27 

Farnam, Lynnwood 22 

Gorgorza, Emilio de 17 

Hofmann, Josef 19 

Lambert, Alexander 20 

Luboshutz, Lea 25 

Rodzinski, Artur 32 

Salmond, Felix 28 

Salzedo, Carlos 29 

Scalero, Rosario 34 

Sembrich, Marcella 16 

Vengerova, Isabelle 21 

Zimbalist, Efrem 26 

Buildings 12 

Calendar 48 

Coaching 15 

Casimir Hall 13 

Concerts — Students' 51 

Student Orchestra 52 

Curtis Quartet 49 

Departments — Academic 36, 37 

Accompanying, Division of 18 

Chamber Music 23 

Harp 23 

Orchestra 30 

Organ 18 

Pianoforte 18 

Supplementary Piano, Division of 18 

Theory and Composition 33 

Viola 23 

Violin 23 

Violoncello 23 

Voice 15 



Page Sixty 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Diction 15 

Dining Room 47 

Enrollment Requirements 46 

Equipment of the Institute 12 

Executive Staff 11 

Faculty — Academic 36, 37 

Musical 14, 15, 18, 23, 30, 33 

Heads of Departments 14 

Health Measures 47 

Lectures on Art 35 

Library 12 

Living Accommodations 47 

Location of the Institute 12 

Offer to Students 7 

Officers 10 

Operatic Acting and Stage Deportment 15 

Orchestra Classes 31 

Orchestra Instruments, Courses in 31 

Plans of Study 39, 40, 41 

Platform Deportment 15 

Practice Facilities 47 

Purpose of the Institute 5 

Recitals, Faculty 50 

Requirements for Entrance Examinations 42, 43, 44, 45 

Students, List of 53, 54, 55, 56, 57 

Studies 38 



Page Siidy-one 



The Curtis Institute 
of Music 

Endowed 
<By MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 




CATALOGUE 

1928-1929 
Second Edition 



RITTENHOUSE SQUARE 
PHILADELPHIA PENNSYLVANIA 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

WAS CREATED, IN 1924, 
UNDER AN ENDOWMENT 

By MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 

AND IS OPERATED UNDER A CHARTER OF 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 



PURPOSE 

TO HAND DOWN THROUGH CONTEMPORARY 

MASTERS THE GREAT TRADITIONS 

OF THE PAST. 

TO TEACH STUDENTS TO BUILD 

ON THIS HERITAGE FOR 

THE FUTURE 



Paqe Five 



The Curtis Institute of Music 
Offers to Students 

Instruction by world famous artists who give individual les- 
sons. 

Free tuition. 

Financial aid, if needed. 

Steinway Grands, string and wind instruments rent free, to 
deserving students; the Steinways being placed in the 
domiciles of students who major in Pianoforte. 

Opportunities to attend concerts of the Philadelphia Orchestra 
and of important visiting artists, also performances of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company — as part of their musical 
education. 

Summer sojourns in the United States and Europe, to ad- 
vanced and exceptionally gifted students, under artistic 
supervision of their respective master teachers of the Curtis 
Institute. 

Public appearances during the period of their studies, when 
warranted by their progress, so that they may gain prac- 
tical stage experience. 

In addition to development of the student to full artistic ma- 
turity, financial assistance in setting out upon a public 
career. 



Page Seven 



Director 

Josef Hofmann 



Page Nine 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



OFFICERS 

President 
Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok 

Vice President 
Philip S. Collins 

Secretary and Treasurer 
William Curtis Bok 

Board of Directors 

Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok 
William Curtis Bok 

Philip S. Collins 
Cyrus H. K. Curtis 
Mrs. Samuel S. Fels 



Page Ten 




o 

I— I 

Q 
I— i 









THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EXECUTIVE STAFF 

Director 
Josef Hofmann 

Secretary to the Director 
Dorothy Lynch 

Executive Secretary 
David Saperton 

Dean 
Grace H. Spofford 

Assistant to the Dean 
Elizabeth Z. Swenson 

Registrar 
Margaret H. Benkert 

Counselor to the Student Body 
Emily L. McCallip 

Comptroller 
H. W. Eastman 

Librarian 
Marjorie Winn 



Page Eleven 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LOCATION 

The Curtis Institute of Music, facing the green of Ritten- 
house Square, is in the heart of the best residential section of 
Philadelphia. It is within four blocks of the Academy of Music 
where the symphony concerts of the Philadelphia Orchestra, 
the concerts of important visiting artists and the performances 
of the Metropolitan Opera Company of New York are given. 

BUILDINGS 

The buildings comprise three beautiful private residences 
which have been remodelled but have retained their original 
homelike atmosphere. 

EQUIPMENT 

The equipment and furnishings combine beauty and 



utility. 



LIBRARY 



The library is of wide scope, embracing over 10,000 
volumes — books, music and scores. It includes many original 
and unedited editions of music of the great masters. 



Page Twelve 







ENTRANCE TO CASIMIR HALL 




< 

OS 



< 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CASIMIR HALL 

Architecturally Casimir Hall corresponds to the Main 
Building of the Institute. 

All the resources of modern research have been used to 
make it acoustically perfect and soundproof against street 
noises. 

The illumination is effected by indirect lighting concealed 
behind the upper moulding around the hall. The interior 
walls are of white mahogany and paneled up to the ceiling. 

The concert organ is a four-manual Aeolian and is used 
for students' lessons as well as for concerts. 

To facilitate the placing of pianos on the stage, a prosce- 
nium elevator has been devised which allows a section of 
the stage to descend to the basement where the concert grand 
pianos are stored. 

In this hall, the students are given the opportunity of 
acquiring experience in students' concerts under conditions 
equaling those under which they will appear in professional 
life. 



Page Thirteen 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS 

The various Departments of The Curtis Institute of Music 
are under the personal direction and supervision of the follow- 
ing members of its Faculty: 

Marcella Sembrich Voice 

Josef Hofmann Pianoforte 

Lynnwood Farnam Organ 

Leopold Auer Violin 

Louis Bailly Viola and Chamber Music 

Felix Salmond Violoncello 

Carlos Salzedo Harp 

Artur Rodzinski Orchestra 

Rosario Scalero Theory and Composition 

These artists, in each instance, in addition to their duties 
as Heads of Departments, instruct students personally. 



Page Fourteen 




Josef Hofmann 
Director oj the Institute 




Marcella 
Sembrich 



Emilio 
de Gogorza 




Richard Hageman 



Horatio Connell 



IE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF VOICE 

Marcella Sembrich, Head of Department 

Instructors 

Marcella Sembrich 

Harriet van Emden 

Emilio de Gogorza 

Horatio Connell 

Coaching and Repertoire 

Richard Hageman 

Artur Rodzinski 

Dagmar Rybner Barclay 

Ilsa Reimesch 

Max Pons 

Diction 

Jean B. Beck 

eufemia glannini gregory 

Samuel Arthur King 

Minna Saumelle 
Hermann J. Weigand 

Operatic Acting and Stage Deportment 

WlLHELM VON WYMETAL, Jr. 

Platform Deportment 
Samuel Arthur King 

Page Fifteen 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



MARCELLA SEMBRICH 

Marcella Sembrich Kochanska, who was destined to 
become one of the world's greatest operatic sopranos, was born 
in Lemberg, Poland. She adopted her mother's maiden name 
of Sembrich to serve her professional career. Her first musical 
instruction was received from her father in piano and violin. 
At the age of twelve she appeared in piano and violin recitals, 
and she continued her study of these instruments with Guil- 
laume Stengel in the Lemberg Conservatory. When she was 
sixteen years old, Marcella was sent to Vienna to perfect her 
musical and pianistic training under Julius Epstein, and it 
was here that her great possibilities as a singer were discovered. 
The girl was then sent to study voice with Lamperti in Milan. 

Her debut as singer was made in Athens in 1877, and 
success in opera came swiftly. Engagements in London, 
Paris, Dresden, Berlin, St. Petersburg (Leningrad), Vienna 
and Madrid followed in quick succession, and in 1883 
Madame Sembrich was engaged as leading soprano at the 
Metropolitan Opera and made her debut as Lucia. Concert 
tours and operatic engagements in Europe alternated with her 
visits to America and from 1902 to 1909 she was continuously 
engaged by the Metropolitan Opera Company. After retiring 
from operatic and concert work, Madame Sembrich devoted 
herself to teaching and has since developed such singers as 
Jeritza, Dusolina Giannini, Hulda Lashanska and Oueena 
Mario. 



Page Sixteen 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EMILIO DE GOGORZA 

Spain, France and England have all shared in the musical 
endowment bestowed on this artist, who was born in 1874 of 
Spanish-American parents, in Brooklyn, New York, first un- 
dertook singing as a serious study in England, and first appeared 
in concerts in France. Emilio de Gogorza traveled with his 
parents as a child and it was in London that he became a 
favorite as a boy soloist in churches and school choirs. He 
completed his studies at the Ecole Monge and Lycee Louis- 
le-Grand in Paris, France. 

De Gogorza returned to America for his first serious 
instruction, his teachers being Moderati and Agramonte in 
New York. A visit to Paris resulted in his continuing his 
studies with Emile Bourgeois, singing master of the Opera 
Comique. In 1897 de Gogorza was first heard in a concert in 
New York with Marcella Sembrich. From that date his ap- 
pearances have been continuous in recitals and with the lead- 
ing orchestras in the United States and Europe. 

With an unusual gift for languages, Emilio de Gogorza 
has been able to enrich his programs with the rarely heard 
songs and folk music of many races. He has cultivated in his 
audiences a taste and appreciation for the songs of the younger 
French composers, for Russian folk songs, and has revealed a 
new world of Spanish art song in the melodies of Andalusia, 
Catalonia, and the country of the Basques. 



Page Seventeen 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF PIANOFORTE 

Josef Hofmann, Head of Department 

Division of Piano Solo 
Josef Hofmann, Head of Division 

Instructors 

Josef Hofmann 
Alexander Lambert 
isabelle vengerova 

David Saperton 

Division of Accompanying 
Harry Kaufman, Head of Division and Instructor 

Division of Supplementary Piano 
Abram Chasins, Head of Division 

Instructors 

Abram Chasins 

Ethel S. Drummond 

Claire Svecenski 

and others, drawn from the student 

body of the Institute. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORGAN 

Lynnwood Farnam, Head of Department and Instructor 

Page Eighteen 





Josef Hofmann 



Alexander Lambert 





Isabelle Vengerova 



David Saperton 




Lvnnwood Farnam 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



JOSEF HOFMANN 

A musical lineage that embraced on his father's side a 
piano teacher, pianist-composer and orchestra leader, and on 
his mother's a noted soprano of the Cracow Municipal Opera, 
furnished the background for the youthful genius, Josef 
Hofmann. He was born in 1876 and began to study music 
before the age of four, his first teacher being his sister. A year 
later Hofmann senior undertook the boy's musical training. 

Josef Hofmann made his first public appearance in a town 
near Warsaw when he was five years old. Other concerts fol- 
lowed in the leading cities of Poland, and when he was eight, 
he was heard by Anton Rubinstein, who predicted a career of 
exceptional brilliance for the youthful prodigy. 

At the age of nine, his first European tour was arranged 
and the boy was heard in Germany, France, England and 
Scandinavia. Soon after, in 1887, he appeared for the first time 
in the United States, giving forty concerts. The remarkable 
playing of the eleven-year-old boy so aroused the enthusiasm 
of Alfred Corning Clark of New York that he generously 
offered to provide his father with the necessary means to fur- 
ther his musical education and artistic growth, whereupon the 
boy returned to Europe to study music in Berlin. Four years 
later he became the only private pupil of Anton Rubinstein. 

In 1894, then eighteen years old, Hofmann returned to 
the concert platform. He toured Germany and England, and 
in 1896 made his Russian debut. Two years later he returned 
for a tour of the United States, and has since been constantly 
before the public as concert pianist and composer. For the 
last twenty-one years Mr. Hofmann has made his home in the 
United States and has become an American citizen. 

Hofmann's compositions are numerous. His orchestra 
works have been performed in the United States and Europe 
by Nikisch, Schuch, Safonoff, Stokowski, Zach, Gabrilowitsch, 
Damrosch, and Stock. 

Page Nineteen 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ALEXANDER LAMBERT 

Born of a musical family in Warsaw, Poland, in 1863, 
Alexander Lambert received his first piano instruction from 
his father, a well-known violinist. 

In 1875, on the advice of Anton Rubinstein, who heard 
the boy play, he was sent to Vienna where he studied at the 
Conservatory with Julius Epstein, Gustav Mahler being a co- 
student. He was graduated with high honors. 

In 1880 he came to America where he remained for three 
years, concertizing and teaching. 

Thereafter he returned to Europe where he was engaged 
by the noted manager, Herman Wolff, to appear in concerts 
and to teach at "Kullaks Akademie der Tonkunst" in Berlin. 
His first concert tours were in conjunction with Joseph 
Joachim and Pablo Sarasate. He also appeared with many 
orchestras and in recitals. 

He then went to Weimar to study with Liszt, his fellow 
students being Moriz Rosenthal, Alexander Siloti, Arthur 
Friedheim and many other well known pianists. 

In 1884 he returned to America to appear as soloist with 
the New York and Boston Symphony Orchestras, and made 
a tour of the leading cities. His love for teaching was always 
uppermost and he established a music school in New York 
City which for eighteen years enjoyed an international repu- 
tation. Today he is acknowledged as one of the leading 
teachers in the United States. 



Page Twenty 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ISABELLE VENGEROVA 

A native of Vilno, Russia, descended from a family that 
was widely known in the field of literature, Isabelle Vengerova, 
at the age of 14, was sent to the Vienna Conservatory, where- 
from she was graduated in 1895. Later, she studied for two 
years with Leschetizky and subsequently with the famous 
pianist, Anette EsipofF. 

Madame Vengerova distinguished herself as a pianist and 
teacher and became assistant to Madame Esipoff at the Im- 
perial Conservatory in St. Petersburg (Leningrad). In 1910 
she was appointed Professor of pianoforte at this famed school 
under the direction of Glazounoff, and remained in this posi- 
tion for twelve years. 

Her concert tours of Russia and Western Europe took her 
to the principal centers of music on the continent, where she 
was acclaimed as a prominent soloist with orchestra, ensemble 
player and recitalist. With Kochanski and Joseph Press, she 
took part in a Brahms cycle, playing for the first time in 
Russia most of the chamber works of that composer. 

Madame Vengerova left Russia in 1922 and came to the 
United States the following year. She has frequently appeared 
in concerts, and has been a member of the piano faculty of 
the Curtis Institute of Music since its foundation. 



Page Twenty-one 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LYNNWOOD FARNAM 

Born at Sutton in the Province of Quebec in 1885, Lynn- 
wood Farnam, organist, began his musical studies as a pianist 
in Dunham, where, at the age of fifteen, he won the Montreal 
Music Scholarship. This scholarship, contributed by Lord 
Strathcona and Lord Mount Stephen, made possible his four 
years of study at the Royal College of Music in London. His 
teachers were Franklin Taylor and Herbert Sharpe for piano, 
and Dr. James Higgs, F. A. Sewell, and W. S. Hoyte for organ. 

The organ won young Farnam's preference, and to this 
he devoted his chief interest. Returning to Canada in 1904, 
Mr. Farnam received his first appointment as church organist 
in Montreal, soon becoming organist of Christ Church Cathe- 
dral. He gave up this post in 1913 to accept a call to Emmanuel 
Church in Boston. The war interrupted his musical career, but 
after his discharge he returned to the United States. 

He was engaged as organist by the Fifth Avenue Presby- 
terian Church, New York City, during 1919-20, and since that 
date has been organist of the Church of the Holy Communion 
in New York. Mr. Farnam has had an extensive concert career, 
having appeared as soloist with the Society of the Friends of 
Music, New York, at the Coolidge Foundation Festival of 
Chamber Music in Washington, the Cincinnati Music Festival, 
and on other notable occasions. He has given public perform- 
ances at York Minster, Bath Abbey, the Cathedrals of West- 
minster, Southwark, Exeter, and Christ Church, Oxford, in 
England, and in the American Cathedral in Paris and at the 
Church of St. Ouen in Rouen, France. 



Page Twenty-two 





Leopold Auer 



Efrem Zimbalist 




Lea Luboshutz 



Edwin Bachmann 




Louis Bailly 



Felix Salmond 







Bj ' ^^Pl H^s""* 




■' 








■ ^ |Tw 


K>'! 










Urn' /JH 






[ 1 . ' JrJ 






Carlos Salzedo 



Albert Meiff 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF VIOLIN 

Leopold Auer, Head of Department 

Instructors 

Leopold Auer 
Efrem Zimbalist 

Lea Luboshutz 
Edwin Bachmann 

Instructor oj Supplementary Violin 
Albert Meiff 



DEPARTMENT OF VIOLA AND CHAMBER MUSIC 

Louis Bailly, Head of Departments and Instructor 

DEPARTMENT OF VIOLONCELLO 

Felix Salmond, Head of Department and Instructor 

DEPARTMENT OF HARP 

Carlos Salzedo, Head of Department and Instructor 



Page Twenty-three 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LEOPOLD AUER 

Leopold Auer, dean of violin pedagogues and "maker of 
violinists," has enjoyed throughout a long life the highest dis- 
tinction in many realms of music. Pre-eminent as a soloist, as 
orchestra conductor, and as teacher, he is also widely known 
for his original compositions and transcriptions. During the 
past twenty years, the success of his pupils has brought him 
worldwide fame. 

Born in Hungary, Leopold Auer studied first at the Vienna 
Conservatory and later with Joachim. Before he was twenty he 
was named conductor of the Dusseldorf Orchestra, and occu- 
pied a similar post in Hamburg. In 1868 he was appointed court 
violinist at St. Petersburg (Leningrad), and held this post con- 
tinuously until the overthrow of the Imperial regime in Russia. 
He succeeded Wieniawski as Professor of the St. Petersburg 
Conservatory, and during this entire period was conductor of 
the Imperial Music Association. He was acclaimed in the prin- 
cipal cities of Europe as the leading violinist of the age. 

Political hazards compelled Professor Auer to leave St. 
Petersburg in 1917, and, after a brief visit to Norway, he came 
to America early in 1918. Here he was engaged for a concert 
tour of the principal cities, after which he devoted himself to 
teaching privately in New York City. Among his pupils are 
numbered Heifetz, Elman, Zimbalist, Kathleen Parlow, 
Cecilia Hansen, Rosen, and Seidl. 



Page Twenly-jour 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LEA LUBOSHUTZ 

Born in Odessa, Lea Luboshutz began her concert career 
as a violinist at the age of six. It was upon the advice and in- 
sistence of Vassily Safonoff, noted Russian conductor, that she 
pursued her studies at the Moscow Conservatory. There she 
received a gold medal for exceptional accomplishment and at 
the age of sixteen was heard in concerts in Poland, Germany 
and France. She appeared with the leading orchestras, includ- 
ing those conducted by Safonoff and Arthur Nikisch. 

Her first appearance in America was as soloist with the 
Russian Symphony Orchestra conducted by Altschuler. An 
extensive tour of Russia and other European countries fol- 
lowed, when she gave more than one hundred recitals. Madame 
Luboshutz then studied for three years with Eugene Ysaye, 
becoming one of his most brilliant pupils. Since then she has 
appeared extensively in concerts in the United States and 
abroad. She has been soloist with the Berlin Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, the Pasdeloup Orchestra in Paris, and has played be- 
fore the King and Queen of Belgium. Madame Luboshutz re- 
turned to America a few years ago as soloist with the State 
Symphony of New York. She has since been heard as soloist 
with the leading symphony orchestras in this country. 



Page Twenty-five 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



EFREM ZIMBALIST 

Known throughout the musical world as one of the most 
brilliant concert violinists, Efrem Zimbalist displayed as a 
child the genius that was to bring him future renown. At the 
age of nine he was appointed first violin in the orchestra of the 
Rostov Opera, in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, where he was born. 
Soon after he was sent to study with Professor Leopold Auer at 
the Imperial Conservatory of Music in Petrograd. 

The principal cities of Europe had already acclaimed him 
as one of the world's greatest violinists when he made his 
American debut in 1911. Since then Mr. Zimbalist has been 
heard in the principal cities of the civilized world, has appeared 
as soloist with the leading orchestras, and has made several 
tours around the world. He has contributed original compo- 
sitions for the violin, piano and voice, and has composed 
successful light operas. 



Page Twenty-six 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LOUIS BAILLY 

A native of Valenciennes, France, born in 1882, Louis 
Bailly devoted the first three years of his musical studies in 
Paris, from 1895 to 1898, to the violin, then transferring his 
allegiance to the viola. At the close of one year's study of viola, 
he headed the list of prize winners at the Paris Conservatory. 
Thereafter he was heard as soloist at the Concerts Colonne, the 
Opera Comique, the Grand Opera, and the Societe des Concerts 
du Conservatoire. He was one of the original members of the 
Capet Quartet, remaining with this organization for seven 
years, and then joined the Geloso Quartet until its disbanding 
at the outbreak of the war. With these organizations he had 
appeared both as soloist and in ensemble in France, England, 
Germany, before the Royal court of Rome, and in Belgium, 
Switzerland and Holland. In 1917 Mr. Bailly obtained a special 
release from military duty to join the Flonzaley Quartet in 
New York. With Harold Bauer at the piano he gave the first 
performance of Ernest Bloch's Suite for Viola and Piano at the 
Pittsfield Festival in 1919. Mr. Bailly has been soloist with the 
Philadelphia Orchestra, with the National Symphony in New 
York under Bodanzky and with the Friends of Music, New 
York City. He is a Cavalier of the Order of the Crown of 
Roumania (1925) and for eight years was a member of the Jury 
of the Paris Conservatory. 



Page Twenty-seven 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



FELIX SALMOND 

A musical endowment was the birthright of this violon- 
cellist, his father being Norman Salmond, celebrated English 
bass-baritone, and his mother a professional pianist. Felix Sal- 
mond was born in London in 1888. His early gifts matured un- 
der the tutelage of Professor W. E. Whitehouse of the Royal 
College of Music in London, where at the end of three years 
young Salmond won a scholarship which he retained for a 
period of four years. He then continued his studies in Brussels 
with Edouard Jacobs. 

Mr. Salmond made his debut in London in 1919, and 
thereafter appeared in concerts throughout Great Britain. He 
was invited by Sir Edward Elgar to appear as soloist in the 
premiere of that composer's Concerto for Violoncello and 
Orchestra, played by the London Symphony. In 1921 he made 
his debut on the Continent in a recital in Amsterdam after de- 
voting two seasons to ensemble playing with the Chamber 
Music Players. 

Mr. Salmond has appeared in concerts with the most cele- 
brated pianists of the day, and as soloist with the leading or- 
chestras. He made his first concert appearance in the United 
States in 1922, and has alternated his visits here with concert 
tours of Europe. While Mr. Salmond is recognized as one of 
the leading exponents of the classical repertoire for the 'cello, 
he has done much to introduce the works of modern composers. 



Page Twenly-tighl 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CARLOS SALZEDO 

Destined to become the leading single factor in elevating 
the harp to a position of undisputed authority and popularity, 
Carlos Salzedo, the creator of "contemporary harpism," won 
his earliest laurels in piano and solfege. He was born in 1885 in 
the province of Gironde, France, and entered the Bordeaux 
Conservatory at the age of seven. In two years he had won first 
prizes in the piano and solfege departments. Thence he went to 
the Paris Conservatory, and at the age of twelve began the 
study of the harp. Four years later he won in one day the First 
Prizes for both piano and harp at the Paris Conservatory. 

Until he was twenty, Salzedo toured Europe both as 
pianist and harpist. Not until 1909, when Gatti-Casazza en- 
gaged him as solo harpist with the Metropolitan Opera, did the 
young musician finally determine which instrument would be 
the one to fashion his career. But once having adopted the 
harp, Salzedo set about to elevate it to its proper place of im- 
portance. He founded organizations and movements to attract 
public interest, and alternated his tours of America with visits 
to Europe. The outbreak of the war found him in Europe with 
the Trio de Lutece, and after his discharge from the army, 
Salzedo returned to the United States. 

He organized the Salzedo Harp Ensemble, and was elected 
president of the National Association of Harpists, which office 
he still holds. With Edgar Varese, he formed the International 
Composers' Guild, and issued a magazine, Eolus, devoted to 
contemporary music. As a teacher, he revitalized harp tech- 
nique and created the system of symbols now universally used 
to designate the means of producing desired effects. His 
"Modern Study of the Harp" is the recognized textbook in this 
branch of music. Salzedo's compositions and transcriptions are 
numerous. His symphonic poem, "The Enchanted Isle," has 
been played by the Symphony Orchestras of Chicago, Detroit, 
Philadelphia and Boston. 

Page Twenty-nine 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF ORCHESTRA 

Artur Rodzinski, Head of Department 

Conductor of the Students' Orchestra 

Instructor of Conducting 

and Orchestra Classes 



Instructors 

Double Bass, Anton Torello 

Flute, William M. Kincaid 

Clarinet, Lucien Cailliet 

Oboe, Marcel Tabuteau 

Bassoon, Walter Guetter 

Horn, Anton Horner 

Trumpet, Sol Cohen 

Trombone, Gardell Simons 

Tuba, Philip A. Donatelli 

Percussion, Oscar Schwar 

(All the above are members of the Philadelphia Orchestra.) 



Page Thirty 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



COURSES IN ORCHESTRA INSTRUMENTS 

There is in the United States a serious lack of players of 
woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments, qualified to hold 
posts in the many symphony orchestras scattered throughout 
the country. There exist today more excellent positions, wait- 
ing to be worthily filled, than there are players ready to fill 
them. 

The instructors of orchestra instruments are artists who 
hold in the Philadelphia Orchestra the posts of solo players of 
these various instruments. 

The Orchestra 

All students of string instruments, and those specializing 
in woodwind, brass, and percussion are required to take part 
regularly in the rehearsals and concerts of the student orches- 
tra. This training is intensified by participation in the orches- 
tra of various solo players of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

Orchestra Classes 

These classes will give students preliminary training in 
orchestra technique, routine, and sight-reading. 



Page Thirty-one 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ARTUR RODZINSKI 

An innate love for music persisted during the early forma- 
tive years of Artur Rodzinski, despite the fact that his father, 
who was an army surgeon stationed at Lemberg, Poland, chose 
the profession of law for his son. Born in 1893, young Rodzinski 
attended the Vienna University where he received the degree 
of Doctor of Laws. Then, having been obedient to the parental 
dictum, he turned to music, his real love. At the Vienna Aca- 
demy he studied piano with Sauer and Lalewicz, theory and 
composition with Marx and Schreker. His teacher in conduct- 
ing was Schalk, and soon young Rodzinski was conducting 
with Schreker the chorus of the Vienna Philharmonic Society, 
and produced the "Totenmesse" of Berlioz. 

The war interrupted his musical activities, but after being 
wounded in action he received his discharge and became con- 
ductor of the Lemberg Opera. Later he was appointed first 
conductor of the Warsaw Opera, and here he was enabled to 
display his initiative in the presentation of new works. Ravel's 
"L'Heure Espagnole," Strauss' "Rosenkavalier," D'Albert's 
"Tote Augen" and Ferrari's "Jewels of the Madonna" all were 
heard under the leadership of Rodzinski before their presenta- 
tion in the larger cities of Europe. During this period he was 
also conductor of the Philharmonic Orchestra in Warsaw. In 
1925 he was engaged by Leopold Stokowski as assistant con- 
ductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 



Page Thirly-lwo 






Gardell Simons 



William M. Kincaid 



Lucien Cailliet 




Artur Rodzinski 



Sol Cohen 



Walter Guetter 






Philip A. Donatelli 



Anton Torello 



Oscar Schwar 




Anne-Marie 
Soffrav 



Renee 
Longy-Miquelle 



Ernest Zechiel 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



DEPARTMENT OF THEORY AND COMPOSITION 

ROSARIO SCALERO 

Head of Department 

and Instructor in Composition, 

Instrumentation and Orchestration 

Instructor in Elementary Counterpoint 
and Elementary Harmony 

Ernest Zechiel 

Instructors in Solfege 

Renee Longy Miqjjelle 

Anne-Marie Soffray 



ACCOMPANISTS 

Harry Kaufman 
Official Accompanist of the Institute 

Other Accompanists: 

Dagmar Rybner Barclay 

Ilsa Reimesch 

and others, drawn from the student 

body of the Institute 



Page Thirty-three 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ROSARIO SCALERO 

In his art Johannes Brahms represents the last of the Ger- 
man masters in whom was blended the tradition of Italian and 
German art, this tradition having come to him from Palestrina 
through an unbroken line of teachers including Albrici (Pales- 
trina's pupil and first cantor of the St. Thomas Church in Leip- 
zig), Fasch, Zelter, Mendelssohn, Joachim, Nottebohm and 
Mandyczewski. Before he reached the end of his glorious ca- 
reer, Brahms had gathered about him in Vienna a circle of art- 
ists who still lived in that marvelous atmosphere where Beetho- 
ven and Schubert had not yet become legendary figures. It was 
into this environment that Scalero came to live as a young man 
and remained for seven years studying composition with Man- 
dyczewski, one of the most intimate friends of Brahms and the 
editor of Schubert's and Haydn's complete works. 

Scalero, born in 1873, began his musical career as a violinist 
at the Liceo Musicale in Turin. Later his studies proceeded 
with Camillo Sivori in Genoa, and then with August Wilhelm; 
in London. At the age of twenty, Scalero won the title of Dis- 
tinguished Academician of the Royal Academy of St. Cecilia in 
Rome, and after his studies with Mandyczewski he was ap- 
pointed Docent of Musical Form at the same Academy. 

After a series of concerts in the principal cities of Europe, 
Scalero settled in Rome, where he founded the Societa del 
Ouartetto, for the performance of ensemble and choral works. 
He has also acted as High Commissioner for Examinations for 
the Conservatories of Naples, Rome, and Parma. His works 
are numerous and include compositions for violin, piano and 
orchestra. 



Page Thirty-jour 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LECTURES ON ART 

A series of eight lectures on Fundamental Principles of 
Expression in Art will be given by Leo Katz, painter and art 
critic of New York. 

1. A Modern Vision of the Development 

of Art October 8 

2. Impersonal Elements: Symbolic and 

Magic Art (with experiments) .... October 15 

3. Rhythm, Personal Expression 

(with experiments) October 22 

4. Color and Light October 29 

5. The Phenomenon of Vision . . . ' . . November 5 

6. Intuition, Religion and Art . . . November 12 

7. The Form of Speed November 19 

8. The Latest Phases in Art .... November 26 



Page Thirty-five 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 

Believing that a broad cultural background is an essential 
factor in the making of an artist, the Institute, in its Academic 
Department, offers numerous courses of studies supplementary 
to the major work in music, whereby the students may secure 
a foundation on which to build in the future. 

The Faculty 

French, and History of Music 

Jean B. Beck, Ph.D. 

Professor of Romance Languages and Literature 

Lecturer on the History of Music 

University of Pennsylvania 

World History 

Roy F. Nichols, A.M.. Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

University of Pennsylvania 

English Composition and English Literature 

William Page Harbeson, LL.B., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English Literature 

University of Pennsylvania 

Elbert Lenrow, A.M. 

Instructor in English 

University of Pennsylvania 

English Diction and Platform Deportment 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A. (London) 

Lecturer in English Diction 

Bryn Mawr College 



Page Thirty- fix 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Italian 

EUFEMIA GlANNINI GREGORY 

German 

Hermann J. Weigand, Ph.D. 

Professor of German Literature 

University of Pennsylvania 

Psychology 

Samuel W. Fernberger, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

University of Pennsylvania 

Academic Tutor 
Mary B. Wesner, A.B. 

Students, unless excused for some valid reason, are required to study 
at least one academic subject each year and to attend certain lectures. 



Page Thirty-seven 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



STUDIES 



Voice 

Pianoforte: 
Solo 

Accompanying 
Supplementary 

Organ 

Violin: 
Solo 
Supplementary 

Viola 

Violoncello 

Harp 

Chamber Music 

and Ensemble Playing 

Operatic Coaching 
and Repertoire 

Operatic Acting and 
Stage Deportment 

Platform Deportment 

Theory: 

Harmony 

Counterpoint 

Solfege 

Dictation 

Chamber Music Score 

Reading 
Elements of Music 
Instrumentation 
Orchestra Score Reading 



Composition 

Orchestration 

Conducting 

Orchestra Playing 

Orchestra Instruments: 
Double Bass 
Flute 
Clarinet 
Oboe 
Bassoon 
Horn 
Trumpet 
Trombone 
Tuba 
Percussion 

History of Music 

World History 

Psychology 

Languages, Literature 
and Diction: 
English 
French 
Italian 
German 



Page Thirty-eight 



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Pfl^e Forty-one 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRANCE 
EXAMINATIONS 

The entrance requirements are presented here in a general 
form, allowing the applicant latitude in the selection of works 
to present for examination. While the choice of compositions 
is important, the manner of performance carries far greater 
weight. The final decision as to the suitability of an applicant 
for acceptance rests upon the evidence of talent shown, in the 
examination, rather than upon the degree of advancement al- 
ready attained. Admission is limited to such applicants as 
possess unusual talent for the major subject selected, and give 
promise of developing professional excellence. Selection from 
among the applicants is made by competitive elimination. The 
examiners do not assume the obligation to hear all that an 
applicant is required to have in readiness to submit for examin- 
ation. 

Voice 

The applicant must possess an exceptionally good voice, 
health, vitality, musical talent and personality. In addition, 
the applicant should have at least an elementary knowledge of 
music and of pianoforte, while some knowledge of languages 
is most desirable. 

Four selections from operatic arias, oratorios or songs, 
showing the range and power of the voice, should be submitted 
from memory. The selections should be chosen from the works 
of the following composers: Parisotti, Handel, Schubert, 
Schumann, Franz, Brahms, Strauss, Tschaikowsky, Rach- 
maninoff, Faure, Debussy, Duparc, Mozart, Bizet, Saint- 
Saens, Puccini, or Wagner. 

In general, applicants should not be over twenty-three 
years of age. 

Page Forly-lwo 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Pianoforte 

Applicants must play from memory a Three-part Inven- 
tion or a Prelude and Fugue from The Well-Tempered Clavi- 
chord of Bach; a Beethoven sonata, complete; two selections — 
one slow and one brilliant — from the works of Chopin or Schu- 
mann (preferably Chopin) . 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

Accompanying 
Applicants shall demonstrate sufficient pianistic ability 
to play satisfactorily some of the more difficult studies of 
Cramer-Bulow, Clementi-Tausig, or Czerny, Opus 740. In 
addition, special stress shall be laid upon the candidate's sight- 
reading powers and sense of musical values as shown by his 
ability to play with reasonable fluency either primo or secondo 
parts of such orchestral and chamber works arranged for four 
hands, as the examiner may choose, and his ability to read at 
sight accompaniments for the violinist or singer. The applicant 
shall moreover have a fair acquaintance either with some of 
the standard violin and 'cello works, or, if his preference lie in 
the direction of vocal accompaniment, some knowledge of song 
literature. 

Organ 

The following should be submitted from memory: (a) 
Fugue or principal movement from a sonata or symphony, 
(b) a trio and (c) a slow movement. 

Applicants must also play the following on the pianoforte^ 
(a) a study, (b) a nocturne or other slow movement. 

Applicants should not be over twenty-three years of age. 

Violin 
Applicants should have a precise knowledge of the positions 
and the change of positions, double notes, and a complete com- 
mand of scales and the usual ways of bowing. They should be 

Page Forty-three 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



able to play selected studies from Kreutzer, Rode and Fiorillo, 
and one or more concertos from the works of the following com- 
posers: de Beriot, Viotti, Spohr, or Vieuxtemps. Selections 
should be submitted from memory. 

In general, applicants should not be over twenty years 
of age. 

Viola 

Applicants must have some knowledge of the clefs, the 
positions, scales and arpeggios; and be familiar with some of 
the standard violin studies such as those of Kreutzer, Rode, 
and also Campagnoli's 41 Caprices, Op. 22, which are especi- 
ally written for the viola. They should also be able to play one 
movement of Firket's or Hans Sitt's Concertos. 

Violoncello 

Applicants must be able to play satisfactorily all major 
and minor scales and arpeggios; also, a fast and a slow move- 
ment from a Bach Suite. They may choose for a second com- 
position one movement of a concerto from the standard reper- 
toire or one movement from a sonata for piano and violoncello, 
classical or modern. It is desirable, but not obligatory, that 
selections be submitted from memory. 

The applicant should not be over twenty years of age. 

Harp 

Applicants should possess a knowledge of the principles 
of modern harp playing and be familiar with the "fundamental 
position/' Knowledge of piano playing is desirable. Applicants 
should submit from memory two works of contemporary com- 
posers and two transcriptions from the classics. 

Applicants should not be over twenty years of age. 

Page Forly-four 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Orchestra Instruments 

The applicant must possess at least an elementary knowl- 
edge of music, a good ear, a good sense of rhythm, be able to 
read from sight, and show talent and aptitude for the instru- 
ment of his selection. 

Composition 

Applicants must submit examples of original work, indicat- 
ing the possession of genuine creative ability. 

Conducting 

Applicants must possess a working knowledge of clefs and 
transpositions, a good ear, a fair knowledge of piano or of some 
orchestra instrument, and adequate theoretic preparation. 

Orchestra and Chamber Music 

Applicants who wish to major in one of these subjects 
must be good sight-readers, have a good ear and sense of 
rhythm as well as a sound musical background. They must 
also show an aptitude for, and knowledge of, their chosen 
instrument. 

The applicants should not be over thirty years of age. 

ASSIGNMENT TO INSTRUCTORS 

Students are assigned to instructors in accordance with 
the recommendation of the examiners. While requests for in- 
struction with particular instructors will be given careful con- 
sideration, the right is reserved to make such assignments as 
seem to be for the best interests of the students. Instructors 
reserve to themselves the right of final acceptance or rejection. 

Page Forty-five 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



ENROLLMENT REQUIREMENTS 

Upon request, forms of Application for Admission will be 
sent to prospective students. 

The acceptance of an applicant is conditioned upon the 
passing of the entrance examination in the major subject. 

Commencing October, 1928, all tuition at The Curtis 
Institute of Music will be free; however, a registration fee of 
$20 must accompany the Application for Admission. This will 
entitle the applicant to take the entrance examination at the 
time set by The Curtis Institute of Music. 

Whether or not the applicant is accepted, the registration 
fee will be allotted to the Students' Assistance Fund. 

An application already on file may be cancelled, if written 
request is made, not less than ten days in advance of examina- 
tion date, in which case the registration fee will be returned. 



Page Forly-six 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Living Accommodations 

Upon request, rooming accommodations selected by the 
Counselor to the Student Body will be recommended to stu- 
dents, according to individual needs and means. Scale of rentals 
and any further details desired may be obtained from the 
Student Counselor. 

Practice Facilities 

For this purpose, the Institute has studios equipped with 
Steinway pianos which may be used by students. One of these 
practice studios is equipped with a three-manual Aeolian prac- 
tice pipe organ. 

Health Measures 

A physician has been appointed by the Institute to give 
immediate attention to students, in case of illness. 

Dining Room 

On week days, home-cooked luncheons and dinners are 
served at cost. These meals form a pleasant break in the day. 
Students and members of the faculty sit at the same tables and 
come to know each other, thus bridging the gulf which too 
often separates student from instructor. 



Page Forty-seven 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



CALENDAR 

For the School Year 1928-29 

First Term Begins Monday, October 1, 1928 

First Term Ends .... Thursday, January 31, 1929 
Second Term Begins .... Friday, February 1, 1929 
Second Term Ends Friday, May 31, 1929 



Thanksgiving 
Christmas Vacation 

Washington's Birthday 



Holidays 

Thursday, November 29, 1928 

. . . December 23, 1928 to 
January 2, 1929 (both inclusive) 

. Friday, February 22, 1929 



Easter Vacation March 29 to April 3, 1929 

(both inclusive) 

Memorial Day Thursday, May 30, 1929 

« 

Entrance Examinations 

Entrance examinations are held at The Curtis Institute of 
Music in Philadelphia in April and May of each year. 

The entrance examination dates for each department may 
be had upon request. 



Page Forty-eight 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



THE CURTIS QUARTET 

The Curtis Quartet has been organized as an integral 
part of The Curtis Institute of Music. It consists of the follow- 
ing members of the Faculty: Lea Luboshutz, Jirst violin, Ed- 
win Bachmann, second violin, Louis Bailly, viola, and Felix 
Salmond, violoncello. 

In 1927-28, aside from its concerts for the students, the 
Curtis Quartet appeared in Philadelphia, New York, and 
Washington. 



Page Forty-nine 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



FACULTY RECITALS 

During the School Year, 1927-28, the following recitals 
were given by members of the Faculty; 
November 9 
December 3 
December 14 
January 4. . 

January 11.. 

January 25. . 
February 8 . 
February 15. 
February 29. 



. Felix Salmond Violoncellist 

. Josef Hofmann Pianist 

.Curtis Quartet 

. Lucile Lawrence Harpist 

TLea Luboshutz Violinist 

\ Josef Hofmann Pianist 

.Emanuel Zetlin Violinist 

.Moriz Rosenthal Pianist 

.Carl Flesch Violinist 

. Emilio de Gogorza Baritone 

March 7 Lea Luboshutz Violinist 



March 21 
April 12. 
April 18. 
April 23 



Horatio Connell Baritone 

Carlos Salzedo Harpist 

. Louis Bailly Viola 

. Harriet van Emden Soprano 

May 16 Abram Chasins Pianist-Composer 

May 24 Josef Hofmann Pianist 

Three lecture-recitals on Music of the Past were given by 
Wanda Landowska: 

November 13. .Descriptive Music of the Sixteenth, Seven- 
teenth and Eighteenth Centuries. 
. Johann Sebastian Bach and His Relation to 
His Predecessors and His Contemporaries. 
Old Dances — How They Were Danced and 
Played. 



November 20 
December 4. . 



April 25 The Henri Casadesus Ensemble of Ancient 

Instruments. 

(This concert was tendered by "The Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge 
Foundation," The Library of Congress.) 



Page Fljty 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



STUDENTS' CONCERTS 

Thirty-three Students' Concerts were given during the 
School Year, 1927-28, with programs presented by students 
in Pianoforte, Organ, Voice, Violin, Viola, Violoncello, Harp, 
Chamber Music and Orchestra. 

In the seven Students' Concerts devoted to Chamber 
Music, the following works were played: 

Antheil Second String Quartet (1927) 

Brahms Horn Trio in E flat major, Op. 40 

Pianoforte Quintet in F minor, Op. 34 

Pianoforte Trio in C minor, Op. 101 

Sonata in G major for Violin and Piano, Op. 78 

Chausson Concert in D major for Pianoforte, Violin, and 

String Quartet 

Franck Pianoforte Quintet in F minor 

Haydn String Quartet in D major, Op. 20, No. 4 

String Quartet in D major, Op. 64, No. 5 

d'Indy String Quartet, Op. 35 

Malipiero Rispetti e Strambotti; String Quartet 

Mozart Pianoforte Trio in G major (Kochel 496) 

String Quartet in B flat major (Kochel 458) 
Symphonie Concertante in E flat major, for 
Violin and Viola 

Saint-Saens . . Pianoforte Trio in F major, Op. 18 

Pianoforte Quartet in B flat major, Op. 41 

Schubert Octet for Clarinet, Horn, Bassoon and String 

Quintet, Op. 166 
String Quartet in D minor, Op. Posthumous 
String Quintet in C major, Op. 163 

Page Fifty-one 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS 

As a result of the progress of our students, the following 
factors have evolved by way of effecting a transition from 
studenthood to public life: 

The Curtis Institute Concert Course 

Concert Courses are being arranged in Universities, 
Colleges, Music Clubs and Civic Organizations. 

The Curtis Institute Orchestra 

This orchestra, consisting of more than one hundred 
students of the Institute, will give public concerts in New 
York, Washington and Philadelphia. 

Chamber Music Groups 

The Casimir and Swastika Quartets, composed of mem- 
bers of the student body, will give public performances in 
New York, Philadelphia and Washington. 

Individual Debut Recitals 

A number of debut recitals have been arranged in New 
York, Washington, Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia. 



Page Fifty -two 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LIST OF STUDENTS 

1927-1928 

Abram, Jack G Houston, Texas 

Adohmyan, Lahn* Philadelphia 

AiROFF, Helene* Los Angeles, California 

Alexander, Norma P.* . . . Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Amansky, Selma C Baltimore, Maryland 

Anderson, M. Elizabeth . . . Barnesville, Georgia 

Anderson, Margaret E Magnolia, Arkansas 

Aronoff, Max Philadelphia 

Balkin, Matilda* Chicago, Illinois 

Bampton, Rose E Buffalo, New York 

Barabini, Olga* New York City 

Barber, Samuel O West Chester, Pennsylvania 

Barozzi, Adine A Paris, France 

Behrend, Jeanne Philadelphia 

Berkowitz, Rosela S.* . . . . Philadelphia 

Berman, Grace Detroit, Michigan 

Binz, Ralph E Philadelphia 

Bitter, John F New York City 

Blankenship, Marion G. ... Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Bloom, Irving R.* Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Bloom, James S Philadelphia 

Bodanskaya, Natalie .... New York City 

Bolet, Jorge L Havana, Cuba 

Boswell, Guy McC Cleveland, Ohio 

Boyington, Alfred M Kansas City, Missouri 

Braun, Edith E Merion, Pennsylvania 

Braverman, Bella Philadelphia 

Briselli, Iso Odessa, Russia 

Brock, Anne B.* Philadelphia 

Cameron, Richard J.* . . . . Philadelphia 

Cameron, William T Providence, Rhode Island 

Carettnay, Illa Philadelphia 

Carroll, William B.* . . . . Chicago, Illinois 

Page Fijty-threc 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Cassini, Leonard London, England 

Cato, Robert H Detroit, Michigan 

Chalifoux, Alice E Birmingham, Alabama 

Challenger, Edward P., II* . . New Castle, Delaware 

Chasins, Abram W New York City 

Chasins, Ethel New York City 

Cherkassky, Shura Odessa, Russia 

Coffey, John W New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Colley, Christine Dayton, Ohio 

Cole, Orlando T Philadelphia 

Collis, James A Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 

Compton, Frederick L Philadelphia 

Conant, Katherine L Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

Connor, Edith S Philadelphia 

Coryell, Marian A Grand Ledge, Michigan 

Coye, John S Wilmington, Delaware 

Cray, Robert E Houston, Texas 

Davis, Agnes Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Davis, Edwin G., Jr Washington, D. C. 

Davis, Verlye A.* Chicago, Illinois 

Deak, Stephen Philadelphia 

Demarest, Charles N.* . . . . Madison, Wisconsin 

Diamond, Paceli Philadelphia 

Eberhard, Ernestine H. ... Allen town, Pennsylvania 

Edwards, Christine Glendale, California 

Epstein, Max Brooklyn, New York 

Evans, Wilbur Philadelphia 

Ferguson, Paull F Robinson, Illinois 

Fields, Eleanor L Norristown, Pennsylvania 

Fink, Mary M Baltimore, Maryland 

Finkelstein, Sidney E Miami, Florida 

Fischoff, Joseph South Bend, Indiana 

Fox, Earl E Scranton, Pennsylvania 

Frantz, Florence Philadelphia 

Freed, David San Diego, California 

Frengut, Leon Baltimore, Maryland 

Page Fijty-jour 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Fulda, Boris Moscow, Russia 

Fulton, Marjorie McA Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

Garratt, Harold V Philadelphia 

Gatter, Herman L Wyncote, Pennsylvania 

Gershman, Paul Vineland, New Jersey 

Geschichter, Cecille .... Los Angeles, California 

Gesensway, Louis Toronto, Canada 

Gilbert, Gama Philadelphia 

Gomberg, Celia Philadelphia 

Gomberg, Robert Philadelphia 

Gough, Frank, Jr Lumberton, North Carolina 

Gray, Alexander* Providence, Rhode Island 

Gray, John Providence, Rhode Island 

Greenwood, Flora B Wichita Falls, Texas 

Groban, Benjamin Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Gumpert, Winifred E.* . . . . Monocacy, Pennsylvania 

Halbwachs, Martha L New York City 

Hall, Helen Dallas, Texas 

Haltenorth, Bernhard W. . Atlantic City, New Jersey 

Hardsteen, Helene P Santa Monica, California 

Hare, Esther B. Caldwell, Idaho 

Harmaala, John H Gloucester, Massachusetts 

Harms, William H Ottawa, Kansas 

Headman, Frank M Roxborough, Pennsylvania 

Healy, Daniel L Framingham, Massachusetts 

Helman, Sascha J New York City 

Hepler, Emily S Ventnor, New Jersey 

Hering, Sigmund* New York City 

Hice, Arthur E Philadelphia 

Hirsh, Harry S Baltimore, Maryland 

Hochstetter, Edna B Philadelphia 

Hodge, Dorothy F Radnor, Pennsylvania 

Hodge, Muriel B Radnor, Pennsylvania 

Hodge, Sonia Kansas City, Missouri 

Hooper, Carl V Mapleton Depot, Pennsylvania 

Horle, Henriette Philadelphia 

Irons, Florence E Burlington, New Jersey 



Page. Fifty-five 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Jepson, Helen E Akron, Ohio 

Jirak, Josephine A Kansas City, Kansas 

Johnson, I. Kenneth Olean, New York 

Johnson, W. Russell* .... Philadelphia 

Jones, Francis E Schenectady, New York 

Jusko, Ralph V Worcester, Massachusetts 

Kahn, Gordon G New York City 

Kaplan, Vilma Baltimore, Maryland 

Kojev, Nicholas N.* Yaroslav, Russia 

Kopelman, Samuel A.* . . . Philadelphia 

Kowalska, Sabina W Wilmington, Delaware 

Krainis, Abraham Philadelphia 

Kramer, Erma K.* Reading, Pennsylvania 

Krechmer, William F.* . . . . Philadelphia 

Krinsky, Yvonne Newark, New Jersey 

Krupnick, Abraham E Philadelphia 

Lamas, Eugene Los Angeles, California 

Lazzaro, Alfio Philadelphia 

Lee, Warren L.* Philadelphia 

Lehnhoff, Sheppard I Chicago, Illinois 

Lenrow, Elbert Bingham ton, New York 

Levin, Sylvan Baltimore, Maryland 

Levine, Joseph S Philadelphia 

Levine, Robert S Dormont, Pennsylvania 

Levitt, Anna New York City 

Lewis, Eleanor J St. Albans, Vermont 

Lockvvood, Ross S Duquesne, Pennsylvania 

Luchs, Selma B Philadelphia 

McAlister, Saidee G Tupelo, Mississippi 

McCurdy, Alexander, Jr. . . . Eureka, California 

McGinnis, Robert E Wyncote, Pennsylvania 

DE Machula, Tibor J Budapest, Hungary 

Mapes, Gordon M.* Bingham ton, New York 

Marks, Maxwell Philadelphia 

Marzyck, Mary A Denver, Colorado 

Matison, Lily Santa Monica, California 

Mayers, Bernard L.* .... Lakewood, New Jersey 

Page Fifty-six 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Mehus, Alma K Brinsmade, North Dakota 

Meiskey, Elsa E Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Menotti, Gian-Carlo .... Milan, Italy 

Meredith, Eleanor F Coatesville, Pennsylvania 

Meyer, Felix Jacksonville, Florida 

Miller, Eugenie Philadelphia 

Mitchell, Ercelle Baltimore, Maryland 

Molind, Aaron Philadelphia 

Montgomery, Mary B Villa Nova, Pennsylvania 

Morales, Angelica M.* . . . . Mexico City, Mexico 

Morseman, Florence J Sedalia, Missouri 

Murdock, Victoria M Wichita, Kansas 

Nazarevitch, Xenia New York City 

Neufeld, Ernst N Kosice, Czecho-Slovakia 

Nicoletta, Eleanor J Philadelphia 

Noyes, B. Frank Groton, Connecticut 

O'Hara, James J.* Rockland, Maine 

Paget, Ethel M Philadelphia 

Peckham, Irene Little Rock, Arkansas 

Pepper, George Los Angeles, California 

Perssion, Ruth* Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Petraites, Peter V Homestead, Pennsylvania 

Pfohl, Ruth W Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Phillips, Edna M Reading, Pennsylvania 

Pickens, Jane Atlanta, Georgia 

Polisi, William Philadelphia 

Pons, Max Amsterdam, Holland 

Poska, Judith Seattle, Washington 

Prydatkevych, Roman .... New York City 

ZU Putlitz, Lois Los Angeles, California 

Pyle, Ella W Wilmington, Delaware 

Ralston, Howard L New Concord, Ohio 

Raphael, Bernard Philadelphia 

Reatha, Reva Detroit, Michigan 

Regina Dolores, Sister .... Philadelphia 

Reinert, Clarence W Allen town, Pennsylvania 

Reinhardt, Donald S Llanerch Manor, Pennsylvania 



Page Fifty-seven 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Reinhardt, Louise Wilmington, Delaware 

Resnikoff, Vera Odessa, Russia 

Richardson, John B Philadelphia 

Robinson, Carl R Louisville, Kentucky 

Robofsky, Abraham H Baltimore, Maryland 

RouBLEFF, Inna . . . . St. Petersburg, Russia 

Ruggieri, Frank Philadelphia 

Saidenberg, Theodore .... Philadelphia 

Savitt, Jay Philadelphia 

Scanlon, Ella H Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Schwartz, Frank J Philadelphia 

Schwartz, Isadore Philadelphia 

Sharlip, Benjamin Philadelphia 

Sharp, Marion Salt Lake City, Utah 

Sharp, Maurice O Sheridan, Wyoming 

Shelton, Frances E Dania, Florida 

Sheridan, Frances E New Castle, Delaware 

Sherman, Charles Philadelphia 

Shopmaker, Leopold Kansas City, Kansas 

Siegl, Henry W Detroit, Michigan 

Simons, Charlotte Chicago, Illinois 

Sivel, Margaret E Philadelphia 

Smith, Norman P.* Philadelphia 

Stark, Ethel Montreal, Canada 

Stern, Lucie Riga, Latvia 

Stetler, Floraine A Detroit, Michigan 

Stevens, Margaret Collingswood, New Jersey 

Swenson, Ervin I Murdock, Minnesota 

Tasso, Fiorenzo Lamparo, Italy 

Temianka, Henri Antwerp, Belgium 

Terranova, Maria* Highland Park, Pennsylvania 

Thibault, Conrad W Northampton, Massachusetts 

Thurmond, James M Dallas, Texas 

Tolces, Toska New York City 

Townsend, Richard E Philadelphia 

Townsend, Winifred Philadelphia 

Trafficante, Elisabeth .... Philadelphia 

Page Fijty-eighl 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Ullberg, Lloyd E Turlock, California 

Van Laningham, Marion M. . . Des Moines, Iowa 

Walker, Louise P Ottawa, Kansas 

Walstrum, Theodore P Ridge wood, New Jersey 

Weinrich, Carl Paterson, New Jersey 

Westmoreland, Elizabeth B. . Antlers, Oklahoma 

Whitehead, Henry C. . . . . Norfolk, Virginia 

Williams, Florence Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Wilson, Frank M Meridian, Mississippi 

Woempner, Carl Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Wyner, Louis Atlantic City, New Jersey 

Yaeckel, Louis W Hollywood, California 

Zimmerman, Oscar G Philadelphia 

* Withdrawing before the close of the year. 



Page Fifty-nine 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Accompanists 33 

Assignment to Instructors 46 

Biographical Notes — Auer, Leopold 24 

Bailly, Louis 27 

Farnam, Lynn wood 22 

Gorgorza, Emilio de 17 

Hofmann, Josef 19 

Lambert, Alexander 20 

Luboshutz, Lea 25 

Rodzinski, Artur .32 

Salmond, Felix 28 

Salzedo, Carlos 29 

Scalero, Rosario 34 

Sembrich, Marcella 16 

Vengerova, Isabelle 21 

Zimbalist, Efrem 26 

Buildings 12 

Calendar 48 

Coaching 15 

Casimir Hall 13 

Concerts — Students' 51 

Curtis Quartet 49 

Departments — Academic 36, 37 

Accompanying, Division of 18 

Chamber Music 23 

Harp 23 

Orchestra 30 

Organ 18 

Pianoforte 18 

Supplementary Piano, Division of 18 

Theory and Composition 33 

Viola 23 

Violin 23 

Violoncello 23 

Voice 15 



Page Sixty 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



Diction 15 

Dining Room 47 

Enrollment Requirements 46 

Equipment of the Institute 12 

Executive Staff 11 

Faculty — Academic 36, 37 

Musical 14, 15, 18, 23, 30, 33 

Heads of Departments 14 

Health Measures 47 

Lectures on Art 35 

Library 12 

Living Accommodations 47 

Location of the Institute 12 

Offer to Students 7 

Officers 10 

Operatic Acting and Stage Deportment 15 

Orchestra Classes 31 

Orchestra Instruments, Courses in 31 

Plans of Study 39, 40, 41 

Platform Deportment 15 

Practice Facilities 47 

Professional Opportunities for Students 52 

Purpose of the Institute 5 

Recitals, Faculty 50 

Requirements for Entrance Examinations 42, 43, 44, 45 

Students, List of 53, 54, 55, 56, 57 

Studies 38 



Page Sixty-one 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

Josef Hofmann, Director 



Announces a Course of Eight Lectures on 

FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF 
EXPRESSION IN ART 

by Leo Katz 



Monday Afternoons at 3.15 o'clock 

Beginning October 8, 1928 
Ending November 26, 1928 



rlttenhouse square 
Philadelphia Pennsylvania 



Subscribers to the Comparative Arts Course during past seasons 
require no introduction to Mr. Leo Katz. The enthusiasm aroused 
by his lectures, and the growing interest displayed in the subject which 
is peculiarly his own, has led The Curtis Institute of Music to engage 
him as sole lecturer in Art for the season 19284929, the course in Com' 
parative Arts having been discontinued. 

The task of reconciling art, science and life has been attempted by 
many artists who have possessed a vision of their essential unity. Few, 
indeed, have arrived at so lucid a realization of their quest as Leo Katz, 
artist, critic and lecturer. If there is a relationship existing between 
philosophy and art, then in the opinion of leading art critics of the 
country Mr. Katz has discovered it. 

His studies in the technical branches of painting have been exhaustive 
in the field of treatments of pigments and mediums, and the problem of 
permanent painting. On the theoretical side he has logically traced a 
pattern that connects all art forms of the past and present with corrc 
sponding developments of science. 

Mr. Katz is a native of Austria, and his fame as a painter led to 
repeated exhibitions of his works in the principal galleries of Europe. He 
came to America in 1920 at the invitation of Mr. Frank A. Vanderlip to 
paint portraits of his family. Since then he has remained in this country, 
lecturing for the Architectural League of New York; the Woman's City 
Club of Boston ; Woman's University Club, Washington, D. C. ; Museum 
of Fine Arts, Detroit; University of California; Leland Stanford Uni' 
versity; the University of New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
New York; and many other organizations. The season of 19284929 will 
be the fifth consecutive season in which Mr. Katz has appeared as lee' 
turer at The Curtis Institute of Music. 

It gives much pleasure to announce that this series will be open to a 
limited number of subscribers in addition to the students of the Institute. 



Course Ticket Ten Dollars 



THE LECTURES 



<4* 



1. A Modern Vision of the Development of Art 



October 8 



2. Impersonal Elements; Symbolic and Magic Art 

(With Experiments) 



October 15 



3. Rhythm, Personal Expression (With Experiments) 



October 22 



4. Color and Light 



October 29 



5. The Phenomenon of Vision November 5 



6. Intuition, Religion and Art November 12 



7. The Form of Speed Hovember 19 



The Latest Phases in Art November 26 



Tobias A. Wright, Inc. 
New York